As a Marketing Assistant for Young Adult and Middle Grade books at Penguin Young Readers and a former Children’s Library Assistant, Bri is well versed in giving book suggestions for any mood or situation. Here’s her list of recommendations for anyone who is up for more heartbreaking, beautifully written reads after they’re done with John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars.

If I Stay

If I Stay, by Gayle Forman

After Mia’s family is involved in a horrific car accident, she must make the ultimate choice: stay alive or let go. With spare prose and a heart wrenching story, If I Stay will break your heart—and put it back together again.

 

 

 

 

 

Thirteen Reasons Why

Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher

Clay receives a box of thirteen tapes from Hannah Baker, his classmate and crush that committed suicide two weeks earlier. On the tapes, Hannah reveals the thirteen reasons why she chose to end her life—and if Clay chooses to listen, he’ll find out why he’s one of them. Asher’s heartbreaking, emotional novel deftly explores the effect people can have on one another, in addition to finding hope in the aftermath of tragedy.

 

 

 

Impossible Knife of Memory

The Impossible Knife of Memory, by Laurie Halse Anderson

This compelling novel from a superstar YA author explores Hayley Kincaid’s struggle to balance the tumult of her father’s PTSD at home with her seemingly normal life at school. Anderson isn’t afraid to face difficult issues head on in this consideration of how one person’s illness can affect a family.

 

 

 

 

LIke No Other

Like No Other, by Una LaMarche

Devorah is a devoted daughter who has never challenged her Hasidic upbringing. Jaxon is a book smart nerd who has never been comfortable around girls. Their chance meeting blossoms into a romance that neither expected. Devorah’s and Jaxon’s unconventional love story will convince anyone that love can sneak up on you, even when you’re least expecting it.

 

 

 

 

Hold Still

Hold Still, by Nina LaCour

After her best friend Ingrid commits suicide, Caitlin is left behind with questions—along with Ingrid’s journal, left behind as a goodbye. Caitlin comes to realize that the journal doesn’t just provide solace, but a means of connecting with others who had been in Ingrid’s life. LaCour’s debut novel examines transformation in the wake of life-altering events with strong writing and an arresting story.

 

 

 

 

The Probability of Miracles

The Probability of Miracles, by Wendy Wunder

Cam, a girl who has spent most of her life in hospitals, has one last goal before the end of her relatively short life: move to Promise, Maine, a place famous for its miraculous events. Wendy Wunder’s first novel explores living life to the fullest in a way that’s both humorous and heartbreaking.

 

 

 

 

 

Find more books to read here.


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