Fall ColorsNothing says fall in New York like the changing of the leaves… well that and apple picking, pumpkin picking, roasted corn, crisp mornings, Pumpkin spiced lattes (or Pumpkin Spiced anything), cider, donuts, the beginning of baking season, sweaters, boots, and scarves! I could go on (trust me) and make a LONG list of all of my favorite fall things, but I will leave you with the abridged version. The short of it is that Fall has arrived in NYC, and while we may still be having 80 degree days, the trees are beginning to tell a different story.

Reading on Deck

To celebrate my love of fall, I took a weekend trip north of the city up to the Adirondacks for a little reading, relaxation, and to take in the changing of the seasons. My first morning I decided to relax on the deck and enjoy the the view. I sipped my coffee and read a bit of the latest book to cross my desk Dear Daughter by Elizabeth Little. Dear Daughter is the Penguin Twitter Book Club Pick of the Month for October. Please join our chat on Tuesday, October 7th and 21st from 2-3PM. You can follow along and ask questions using #ReadPenguin. I am not a big mystery fan, but I am really enjoying this one! Start Reading an Excerpt!

reading lake

After a nice leisurely morning with a cup of coffee and my book, I decided to go for a hike around the lake. I brought my book (naturally), because I don’t go anywhere without one as a rule. You never know when you are going to come across a nice spot to sit and read! Bringing it along turned out to be a good decision, because I think I may have found my new favorite reading hideaway. Not a bad view, don’t you think? It turned out to be less of a hike, more of a walk through the woods. I spent a long time reading on this rock overlooking the lake. Overall I think it was a success.

The rest of the trip was spent apple picking, donut eating, barbecuing, and enjoying a little peace and quiet. It was nice to have a few days away from the city and it gave me a chance to take a deep breath and unwind before jumping back into the work week. October is here and we are busy as ever! New York Comic Con is right around the corner, stop by the Penguin Booth and say hi! We are gearing up for our Holiday promotions and have a number of exciting sweepstakes coming out weekly on our Facebook and Twitter pages. And on top of all of that we have lots of new and exciting books coming out (there never seems to be enough time to read them all!) But enough about me, what are you up to this fall? Any weekend vacation suggestions or favorite Fall activities? We would love to hear about them in the comments!

Happy Fall and thanks for reading! Until next time,

Shelby


Laura

Laura Perciasepe is an Editor at Riverhead Books. She acquires and edits a wide range of literary fiction, narrative nonfiction, and works in translation. Originally from Baltimore, she now lives in Brooklyn.

 

 

 

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, by Mohsin Hamid

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, by Mohsin Hamid

I cried at the end of this book so you know it’s good. This is Gatsby-ish in its scope; the tale of a young impoverished boy in an unnamed Asian city, on the rise, of course. There’s a love story, a story of success and failure, a family story, all bound up in this remarkable journey, both intimate and universal. I can’t recommend it enough. It’s short yet packs an unbelievable punch.

 

 

 

 

The Sound of Things Falling, by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

The Sound of Things Falling, by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

I know this word is over-used in describing good books, but this book is truly stunning. A work in translation that has won accolades across the globe, this novel begins with a hippo escaped from a Colombian drug lord’s derelict zoo and doesn’t let up from there. It’s a page turner, a monumental story of politics and family, love and violence.

 

 

 

 

Juliet, Naked, by Nick Hornby

Juliet, Naked, by Nick Hornby

I love all of Nick Hornby’s books but this recent one has a special place in my heart. It’s classic Hornby, full of complicated relationships, humor, sweetness and sadness, and music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vacationers, by Emma Straub

The Vacationers, by Emma Straub

This is the book I’ll be recommending all summer and I only regret that I read it myself before beach season! Emma Straub takes us on a trip to Mallorjca with a New York family that feels very familiar in its dysfunctions and in its bonds. It’s a keenly observed story with heart (that also looks great on your Instagram with its vibrant cover).

 

 

 

 

Margot, by Jillian Cantor

Margot, by Jillian Cantor

This is a what-if story about Anne Frank’s sister Margot, if she had escaped the war and come to America, living here in the 1950s as her sister became a cultural icon of hope. A psychologically sophisticated novel about sisters, memory, and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive – this book became a house favorite at Penguin and it’s un-put-downable (that’s a real book publishing term, promise!).

 

 

 

 

The Solitude of Prime Numbers, by Paolo Giordano

The Solitude of Prime Numbers, by Paolo Giordano

This is another book in translation that I couldn’t recommend more – a completely unique voice and love story that transfixed me when I read it and has stayed with me long after. It’s about two Italian teenage misfits, the mathematics of humanity, recovery from trauma, and love.

 

 

 

 

 

Find more books on the Literary Fiction page!

See Staff Picks for all our categories! 


photo 2I don’t publish a lot of fiction, so when I do, I want it to be extraordinary: surprising,  engrossing, memorable – in short, a special book you’ll remember long after you’re doing reading it. Sundance by David Fuller is all of that – and much more.

Sundance is the story of Harry Longbaugh, a bank robber in the early 20th century better known to the world as the Sundance Kid. Legend has it that Sundance was killed with his partner in crime, Butch Cassidy, in a gun battle in Bolivia in 1908. Sundance imagines a different scenario. Instead of dying in South America, Harry was imprisoned in Wyoming under his real name and is released in 1913 with one goal in mind: To find his wife, Etta, who stopped visiting him in jail several years before.

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Harry’s search for Etta leads him from the stark emptiness of the Old West to the bustling chaos of New York City at a time when cultures and classes were clashing. From suffragette protests to the rise of the Black Hand to the digging of the New York City subway system, New York was a place of dizzying change – and unexpected danger.

Sundance is equal parts historical novel, literary thriller, and rollicking adventure story, and it calls to mind books as varied as The AlienistThe Death Instinct, and the novels of C.J. Box and Larry McMurtry.  The author, David Fuller, is both a talented writer and a wonderful storyteller, and he brings his characters to vivid life in the pages of this terrific novel.

Start Reading and excerpt from Sundance.

Read Sundance author David Fuller’s essay on the wife of “The Sundance Kid” and discover more new westerns.


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Welcome to Penguin This is my desk.

Welcome to 375 Hudson Street!

With the warm weather approaching, things are getting busier and busier here as we gear up for our summer season. Next week Penguin heads to Book Expo America (BEA), the industry book and author conference in New York City, which we are all very excited for. (Stop by the Penguin Booth and say hi if you are attending this year!) We have a lot of great authors going and it should be a lot of fun—look for our BEA wrap-up post coming soon where Amy, Lindsay, and I will all share our BEA 2014 photos and stories!

There is always something going on in our offices and this week (for me at least) it has been a busy one, but let’s focus on the fun bits from the last few days!

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This Wednesday, the Penguin Twitter Book Club held its second May #ReadPenguin chat with Jolie Kerr, author of My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag…And Other Things You Can’t Tell Martha—my favorite question from the chat was “How do you clean a lasagna spill off the street?” If you are not already joining our Book Club chats you should, because we get to talk about fun things like lasagna (and books too, of course!) Next month we are chatting with Yours for Eternity authors Damien Echols and Lorri Davis.

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Beartiz Williams signing her new book THE SECRET LIFE OF VIOLET GRANT

 

On Thursday, New York Times bestselling A Hundred Summers author Beatriz Williams stopped by to say hello and sign copies of her new book The Secret Life of Violet Grant, which comes out next week on Tuesday, May 27th and which I am very excited to read. Amy and I went up to say hello and grab a picture. See you next week at BEA, Beatriz!

Today, Friday, we have a half-day to kick off Memorial Day weekend.

Just your typical week at the office…and now I am off to sunny (fingers crossed) Long Island to sit outside and enjoy the weekend. What are your Memorial Day plans?

Until next time,

Shelby


mistakesFirst, open a Twitter account.  Sit on a chair outside of your daughter’s room at night, because she insists.  This lack of personal freedom is the reason that you were able to complete an entire book in nine months.  Now she’s asleep but you stay there, hands hovering over the keyboard.  Know that you MUST TWEET.  The pressure is overwhelming.  No witty quip will be witty enough, so decide to write about politics. Think about politics and draw a blank.  Close Twitter and open the NY Times. Go to “most emailed articles,” where number eight is a piece on making green smoothies. Become deeply absorbed.

Your sister-in-law has generously, patiently followed you around with her fancy camera, taking photos against backgrounds that might make you look like an author.  The pillars of Smith College; a lovely tree beside an academic building that – when you check the camera’s small bright screen – looks like it’s growing out of your head. Finally, you lead your sister-in-law back to your own office and stand against the bright red wall that makes everyone look good.  Click.  The picture pops up over and over when you post media interviews with YOU on Facebook.  Finally, a guy in Florida messages you saying he likes the way you look. “Ick,” says your husband. “Erase it.” Feel put-off and quite flattered.  Wonder if this is what it would be like to online date.  Refresh Facebook every ten minutes to see all of the likes. Smile.

The night before your book is actually published, leave your phone by your bed.  Check email at 1:00 am, 3:00 am and 5:00 am. Imagine bookstore owners around the country tearing into brown cardboard boxes filled with copies of your book, lifting those copies to the light and air.  Cue religious music – you’re Jewish, but this is Christian music, sweet voices of altar boys echoing in a cathedral where the windows are your book cover design made out of stained glass.  No reviews have come in by 5:00, so you rise and eat a nice bowl of pub day oatmeal.

Get your hair streaked with gold.  Wear bright red pants.  It’s the day of your son’s flute recital and so you walk over to the concert hall in this get-up.  This is a small town filled with students who wear pajamas to class and out into the street; this is a town where everyone knows you didn’t have gold streaks before you wrote a book; everyone knows you didn’t own red pants.  Decide not to care. Put on sunglasses to complete the look.  Feel like a show-off.

Wear your show-off outfit to the local bookstore, which has sold-out of the one copy of your book it had in stock – purchased by your colleague.  Talk to one of the booksellers, a tall, placid man with gray hair and the furrowed brow of a serious reader. Imagine that your book isn’t serious enough for him. Follow him around as he shelves novels written by other people, and offer phrases like, “I’m wondering,” and  “it would be great” and “I’d be happy to.”  Finally, he will turn to you and make eye contact, saying a box of your books is due in soon. Refrain from making yourself a total fool by asking – as he turns from you and continues shelving – if he’d like you come back and sign them.  Leave feeling like you have done well because you didn’t jump onto the counter and cry, “Am I not a local author? If you prick me, do I not bleed?”

When your publisher asks you to write for the new Penguin blog, consider the assignment and realize that writing about “anything” is hard. Does this mean you’re not a real writer? Maybe. Open Twitter, and notice that several male crime novelists are now following you. Wonder if this is creepy or nice.  Check Facebook again.  Realize that you’re hungry. You will need something, maybe green smoothie, before starting to do any real work.


jessicabacalI’ve lied to the people who ask, “How did you write a book while having a full-time job? And young children?”

“Fear,” is what I’ve told them, “fear of not getting it done, once I had a contract.”

It’s a nicely self-deprecating answer – better than, “I got it written because I’m AWESOME,” which might be slightly off-putting.  And actually there was some fear motivating me.  Now that the book is done, there is also some feeling of awesomeness, of pride in having finished . . . but the REAL answer to the question, “How did you write a book?” is this: “I was collaborating with a great team.”

Lindsay Edgecombe is my agent; she’s on the right in the photo.  She loved my book idea, and gave me guidance on developing the proposal. Then it was up to me to actually do the work, and the half-done proposal languished on my desk for many months.  Ironically, Mistakes was aimed at encouraging women to take risks, but I wasn’t sure if I was up for the risk of writing a book.  It just seemed SO big – and what if I didn’t finish it?  Also, the original idea for the book was that it would consist of essays I’d have to gather – and what if I couldn’t gather enough?

Luckily, along came Plume’s Kate Napolitano.  She’s my editor, and is just to my left in the photo.  After Lindsay said, “Let’s get this proposal finished” and pushed me to wrap it up, she sent it to several editors.  Kate is one of the editors who then talked to me over the phone, and I could tell that she was full of energy and excitement about the project, that she really “got” it. When Plume came back with an offer, things took a turn for the better.  Kate said, “People at Plume are wondering if you’d like to do the book as interviews rather than essays.” This would mean I’d actually TALK to each of the contributors about their mistakes, interviewing the women myself. I loved it.

Guidance from Lindsay and Kate didn’t end there. Kate had the wisdom to invite me to send her my first completed, written-up interview– and she had a lot to say about it.  Honestly, I wasn’t doing it right, wasn’t crafting the transcript into a story.  But I paid attention to Kate’s feedback and to Lindsay’s, and did better with the next interview, then even better.

When the book was finished and ready to go into the world, along came Milena Brown – that’s Milena on Kate’s left.  Milena is excellent at what she does, which means that she creates publicity fireworks in the most low-key way.  Somehow, she knows exactly who might take an interest in my book, and gets it into that person’s hands.  I imagine that she’s doing this for tens of authors (more?) but she manages to make me feel like she’s got this down, easy.  Even my friends on Facebook have started commenting, “Wow, you lucked-out with your publicist.”

Yes, there was some fear involved, but more importantly, there were these women: Lindsay, Kate and Milena.  They are AWESOME.

Check back Thursday, 5/22 for the next post in this series.


Becky Saletan with CREATIVITYI first had the opportunity to work with Philippe Petit back in 2001, when, shortly after the destruction of the Twin Towers, he wrote a book about his world-famous 1974 high-wire walk between them – what better commemoration could there be? The book was titled To Reach the Clouds, and it became the basis for the Academy Award-winning documentary Man on Wire (and the tie-in edition was retitled to match). At our very first meeting, I said, “You should know before you consider whether you want to work with me that I suffer from terrible vertigo.” Philippe’s eyes went wide and he responded, with what I would come to know as characteristic vehemence, “So do I!” While I knew that the walk had been decades in the planning, it had never occurred to me that this seemingly fearless creature had had to overcome any internal obstacles to perform his superhuman feat.

We had a tremendously exhilarating time working together on that book, and after it was published I stayed in touch, mesmerized by this practitioner of an ancient art form (wire-walking dates to the Middle Ages) and so many others – drawing, magic, carpentry, street-juggling, and of course, writing. I was impressed not only by the amazing number of forms Philippe has mastered but by his unique approach to the creative process, and his exceptionally original insights into it, from how he develops his ideas to how he deals with problems and setbacks to how he executes a finished performance or work of art. I was also struck by how broad an audience the book could apply to, since Philippe himself puts his principles to work in both his performing and nonperforming arts – indeed, lives by them. Most of all, I experienced how much simply being around him and catching his enthusiasm had encouraged me to take on challenges in my own life, to push myself to tackle the im-pos-si-ble (that’s how he saw the word, its syllables stretched between the towers, when he first snuck up to the top of the still-under-construction World Trade Center). And so I suggested to him that he write a book about creativity – which to me was a little like suggesting to Julia Child that she write a book about French cooking, or to Gabrielle Garcia Marquez that he write a novel, an idea so obvious as to be a no-brainer. My husband, however, gets credit for the subtitle, “The Perfect Crime,” which he thought would appeal to Philippe’s iconoclastic personality – and captures beautifully the outlaw sensibility Philippe has cultivated.

I’m incredibly excited about the book that has resulted, which I see as appealing to readers who loved Twyla Tharp’s The Creative Habit, Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way, and Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird – it’s of that family, so to speak, and at the same time utterly unlike anything I’ve ever read about creativity before. And it contains incredible original drawings by Philippe, which intensify the feeling that you’ve been invited inside the vision of one of the most amazing creators of our time.  


Women have done amazing things for literature and have been an instrumental part in shaping the literature of today as well as the current publishing industry. In honor of National Women’s History Month we wanted to recognize these impressive women for all that they have done and will continue to do in the future.

There are too many amazing women, inspiring female characters, and wonderful authors to name, so instead I am going to discuss the ten books that have most inspired and/or deeply affected me in the last year. As a happy coincidence, ALL of these ten books were written by women. Today you get the second half. Check out My 10 Favorite Books from the Last 10 Months (Part 1) for the first half of this list.

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd

This is hands down my favorite book (at the moment). It also happens to be one that truly encapsulates Women’s History Month. The Invention of Wings follows the lives of two women from opposing backgrounds. Sarah Grimke, the daughter of a wealthy family in early nineteenth century Charelston is given a present that alters her life. Meet Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave and Sarah’s eleventh birthday present. Kidd follows the lives of these two women from childhood into adulthood. We watch as they grow up, grow apart, and rebel against the lives they were born into.

What I think is particularly compelling about this book is that it looks at slavery from the slave, the slave owner, and the abolitionists perspectives all at once. On top of the slavery discussion, this book also looks at gender roles and the strict confines of society on women. Sue Monk Kidd presents an interesting comparison between abolitionism and women’s rights that is still relevant today. This is a book that I would recommend to anyone, but particularly to a female audience.

Sue Monk Kidd is also the author of The Secret Life of Bees, another book that I would recommend.

 

Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Counting by 7s, by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Coping with death and loss appears regularly in literature. This is a middle grade novel told from the perspective of twelve-year-old genius. Willow is not your average middle schooler, she is incredibly smart, and prefers her garden and her medical textbooks as opposed to other kids her age. When Willows adoptive parents both die in a car crash she is forced to come to terms with her parents’ death and her grief while simultaneously finding herself and her place in the new world she has been thrust into. Told through Willows’ unique, intelligent, and scientific-minded voice we follow along as this young girl turns her grief into a discovery rather than a tragedy.

I bet you were not expecting to find a middle grade novel on this list, and I can assure you that when I picked it up for the first time I was not expecting this book to be in my Top Ten either. But the surprise is what makes this book so special.

 

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

What Alice Forgot, by Liane Moriarty

What Alice Forgot is the saddest books that I have ever read and I like sad books so that is saying a lot. I’m a fan of any book that I am still thinking about days, weeks, and months later and this book is exactly that!

Married couples splitting up have become the norm. Divorce rates are high. I am just entering the phase of life where weddings are a regular event. I have been told to enjoy this “wedding phase” while it lasts because after that comes the “kid phase,” and then the “divorce phase.” What Alice Forgot deals with all of these three phases of life. Alice has amnesia. She wakes up in the middle of a ugly divorce and her children are in their early teens. However in Alice’s head, she is a newlywed, floating in marital bliss, and pregnant with her first child. She is quite confused, as you might imagine.

Moriarty magnifies both of these two pivotal times by examining how Alice fell in and out of love. I am a fast reader and I like to start and finish a book all in the same week. This book took me a while. I found myself regularly having to stop and think about what I had just read, for a day and often for a week. This is a difficult book to read in one sitting and is not necessarily one to take on vacation. What Alice Forgot will make you pause and really think about the ways we treat others and ourselves.

 

Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi

Ghana Must Go, by Taiye Selasi

Every book on this list is here for a reason and Ghana Must Go is here for several, one of which being that it may be the most beautifully written book that I have read in my life.

Kweku Sai, a divorced father of four and renowned surgeon, is dead. His death starts the ripple of events that bring his estranged family slowly back together. Secrets and disappointments have drawn the family apart over time and it takes the death of their father to bring them back together. This novel looks at the unconditional love of family and “teaches that the truths we speak can heal the words we hide.”

This is a book that spans generations, moving seamlessly through time, point of view, and voice as it looks at how a single family grew up, grew apart, and what it took to bring them back together. Taiye Selasi is a beautifully eloquent writer who I cannot wait to read more of.

 

Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan

Golden Boy, by Tara Sullivan

This is a book truly unlike any other I have ever read. Golden Boy looks at the life of thirteen-year-old Habo, who is growing up in a small Tanzanian village. His father abandoned the family because he could not accept his son. His mother will not look at him. His brother terrorizes him. The other children in the village have never asked him to play. Habo is alone and different. When Habos’ family is cast out of their village, he knows his yellow hair, light eyes, and white skin is the reason why. As his family travels across the Serengeti in order to seek refuge in Mwanza, Habo discovers his curse has a name: Albino, and there are people hunting him.

When I think of oppression and discrimination, in terms of history, there are three things that come to mind: slavery, women’s rights, and the holocaust. Maybe this is because I commonly have more access to books that discuss these issues, maybe it is because these are common topics in literature, but it is both refreshing and upsetting when you come across a case of discrimination as graphic and disturbing as the one discussed in this book. Particularly when you did not previously know it existed.

Golden Boy is a Young Adults book and while aimed at a younger audience, was one of the more enlightening and educational books that I have read this year.


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Right now Edge of Eternity is being copy edited. This painstaking process is tremendously valuable to me.

A regular editor has to find good authors and help them write good books. A copy editor is something quite different. She looks for mistakes. (They are usually women, don’t ask me why.)

First she checks spelling and punctuation. Now, my spelling is not bad, and I always look up difficult words such as Khrushchev (three aitches) or Willy Brandt (not Willi Brand). But she always finds some errors.

Then she checks consistency, just like the continuity person on a movie set, who makes sure that if the actor is wearing a green sweater when he goes to the front door, he’s wearing the same sweater two weeks later when they film him coming out of the house. A copy editor makes a note that Rebecca is thirty in 1961, and checks that when we get to 1971 I don’t absent-mindedly say she’s forty-five.

The copy editor looks for inadvertent repetitions. If I come up with a description I like, such as sparkling sea-green eyes, I might think of it again three months later, forgetting that I’ve already used it.

Do these little mistakes matter? Yes—because you, the readers, notice them. There you are, sitting by the fireside, completely absorbed in the story, anxious or sad or indignant about what the characters are doing, when suddenly you look up and frown, thinking: Wait a minute, Follett’s got that wrong! And the spell is broken.

In case you haven’t already guessed, copy editors are nit-pickers, and they drive me up the wall. But they save me from breaking the spell. That’s why I love them.

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Romance is My Day Job, Patience BloomI often encounter people who say, “I’m going to write a romance novel. It’s so easy. Just write to a formula and send it in.” Romance writers and editors laugh a little at this because it’s not so easy. Believe me, I’ve tried it—at least ten times and can’t get past chapter three. But say you do have that true drive to publish in romance, here are a few steps you need to take.

  1. Love writing. Love love. To write a romance, you have to immerse yourself in the goo of love—how exciting, difficult, invigorating, frustrating, and life-affirming it is.
  2. Write a good book. Throw your heart and soul into your romance. This could be the beginning of a new life and you want to give it your best shot. You will find many references and I’d recommend first off Writing a Romance Novel for Dummies by Leslie Wainger. Also read GMC: Goal, Motivation, and Conflict by Debra Dixon, along with every romance-how-to you can find.
  3. Don’t do it for the money–even though money is nice. If I had a nickel for how often I’ve heard, “To make some extra dough, I’ll just write romance novels.” Many paid writers learn that you can’t count on a paycheck when you write. And this paycheck depends on your next book, which may not sell. There has to be another reason for writing a romance.
  4. Try not to get too attached on the outcome: I must get published. I’m desperate to get published. If I don’t get published, I’ll be miserable forever. Please publish me now. When you write because you love to write, it shows in your work.
  5. Make one new contact a day with fellow romance-aholics/industry professionals. It’s easy to develop a one-sided relationship with your computer. Get some fresh air, interact with others and move ahead.
  6. Have other people read your good book and take their suggestions seriously. The romance world is a nurturing business, for the most part. Sure, it’s not perfect but adopting a positive relationship with your fellow writers is key. When you show your work, expect suggestions and support. We all want your book to be amazing! Just think, you could be the writer who makes me forget all my problems and get lost in your story. This is a gift to a reader.
  7. Map out your publishing ambitions: traditional publisher vs. self-publish. If the former, which houses/editors would like your book? Do research on publishing houses’ lists. I suggest doing this when you’ve completed a rough draft of your book. If you go the self-publishing route, be sure to strategize how you will tackle the many hats you’ll wear as your own publisher. It’s all exciting, but planning is crucial.
  8. Have your next story in mind. If you meet with an editor and she isn’t so hot on your project, tell her what else you have. In romance, we want to build you as an author. The more you write, the more possible this is. No achy breaky one-hit wonders here.
  9. Go to conferences and chapter meetings. Follow up on the inspiration you get from these outings, i.e. read the books you find, chat with new friends, go through your notes from the workshops and revise your book accordingly.
  10. Rewrite your page-turning romance until your brain nearly explodes. When you read your book without an iota of boredom/frustration/misgiving, unleash it on the editors and see what happens.
  11. Patience is a virtue. You know I had to throw that in. There is a lot of waiting when you submit to traditional houses. It’s part of the deal. What do you do while you wait? Repeat tip #2.
  12. If at first you don’t succeed, never ever give up writing or trying to get published. One of the heartbreaks we editors experience is when a writer abandons her craft. Life can intervene or maybe that drive has fizzled. One must obey that call to other bliss, of course. But if there’s a morsel of yearning that keeps you obsessing about writing, just do it, keep doing it and submit until you can’t submit no more (also read Chicago Manual of Style, which would tell me not to use a double negative).

Because of our readers’ voracious appetites, we constantly need books. You’ll see us on Twitter, Facebook, at conferences begging for a great new story. Face it, romance writers keep us in business (you don’t want us to starve, do you?). So, keep these tips close and if you ever feel discouraged or inspired, read them again them, stay positive, and submit your story.