julianne

Julianne Clancy is a master of horror. Literally. She got her master’s degree in horror literature from Trinity College Dublin in 2009. She now spends her days as a copywriter for Berkley and NAL, and her evenings trying to convince her husband and her cat to sit through an endless stream of B-horror movies and Paranormal Activity sequels. She also cooks a lot.

 

 

haunting

The Haunting of Hill House,by Shirley Jackson 

If James Brown is the godfather of soul, Shirley Jackson is the godmother of the American Gothic. Her stories are some of the most chilling, twisted, and mind-bending in horror, and The Haunting of Hill House is the crowning achievement within her wonderful body of work. Part ghost story, part psychological puzzle, and completely terrifying, Jackson’s magnum opus will have you glancing over your shoulder to make sure none of the spirits on the pages have somehow come to life. A tour-de-force of horror that questions the nature of depression, insanity, and pure supernatural evil.

 

 

it

It, by Stephen King

Any list of great horror novels would have to include at least one entry from Stephen King. For me, that one book is, without a doubt, IT. King’s story of a cruel clown stalking the children of Derry, Maine plays off of the childhood fears we all still feel when something goes bump in the night. However, King’s true achievement here is in the characters, both the good and the bad, who prove to be so much more important, impactful, and horrifying than any other-worldly being could ever be. If Pennywise the Clown doesn’t frighten you, I guarantee vicious bully Henry Bowers will.

 

 

thoseacrosstheriver

Those Across the River, by Christopher Buehlman

Buehlman wins my vote for best new horror writer of the past several years. He deftly handles creature horror while still keeping his work grounded in realistic fears that are unsettlingly relatable. This haunting tale of a failed academic discovering the dark, bloody secrets of a southern town is guaranteed to have you turning pages long into the night—and sleeping with the light on afterwards.

 

 

 

 

littlestranger

Little Stranger, by Sarah Waters

Traditional gothic horror isn’t for everyone, but I happen to be a huge fan of the slow, creeping terror that true gothic can provide. Sarah Waters calls to mind Henry James or Edgar Allen Poe with her carefully written, chilling novel about a poor doctor in postwar England. Family secrets, insanity, and the hint of something more sinister abound—a delicious combination that gothic devotees will devour.

 

 

 

 

omegadays

Omega Days by John L. Campbell

I love zombies. Always have, always will. However, I’d be the first to admit that many zombie tales fall into the category of silly or overdone. John L. Campbell’s Omega Days breaks the mold. Following a motley cast of characters as they face a sudden and devastating zombiepocalypse, this series opener reads more like a cautionary tale about human nature in crisis than standard zombie fare. Lots of action, but also lots of thought-provoking scares to keep you ruminating long after you finish the last page.

 

 

 

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Kent_Javits
Kent is the Director of Online Sales and Marketing.  Being a birder (twitcher, for those across the pond), it’s kismet that he works for a company with a bird in its title. He will not be entering the Penguin Cup Fantasy Football League.

 

 

 

 

jasper

Shades of Gray, by Jasper Fforde

Jasper Fforde is the master of creating whole new worlds that fly off the pages.  Anyone who reads must pick up his first novel The Eyre Affair which begins the hilarious Thursday Next series.  In Shades of Gray, Fforde sets off on a different course with this dystopian tale of a society, Chromatacia who’s hierarchy is dictated by the color they can see.   With his typical sense of humor and vivid prose Chromatacia leaps off the pages. And if there ever was a film adaptation it would win every Cinematography/Art Direction award available.

 

 

 

archetype

Archetype, by MD Waters

Archetype is the beginning of a post-apocalyptic two book series that concludes with Prototype. Describing Archetype without spoilers is difficult but at its heart is a very complicated love triangle which will have you turning the pages faster and faster to find out who wins Emma’s heart. And while there is a heart tug of war, Emma must figure out who she is. Archetype is an entertaining read with thought provoking theme similar to those evoked in The Handmaid’s Tale.

 

 

 

office

Office of Mercy, by Ariel Djanikian

If anyone is old enough to remember Logan’s Run then they will be reminded of the setting when reading The Office of Mercy. After the Storm, America-5 citizens live in a high-tech, environmentally controlled Utopia, underground basically.  And The Office of Mercy is in charge of the nomadic post-Storm survivors on the outside.  There many twists and turns, uncovered secrets that will leave you wondering what is right and what is wrong. A great read that will leave you wanting more.

 

 

 

postmortal

The Postmortal, by Drew Magary

Full disclosure, The Postmortal is on this reviewer’s to-read list but it comes highly recommended. The cure has come in the near-future tail, the cure for aging that is.  But of course, immortality comes with its own set of problems. Drew Magary is a 21st century Renaissance man. He writes hysterical columns for Deadspin and recently published a memoir on 21st century parenting.  Thus The Postmortal is bound to be a wild ride.

 

 

 

legend

The Legend Trilogy, by Marie Lui

Legend begins Marie Lui’s wonderful Legend trilogy. If you enjoyed The Hunger Games, you will enjoy Legend more. In Legend, the Western United States is now The Republic and perpetually at war. Day, born into slums and on the most wanted list for murder, becomes a reluctant hero to a revolution. On his tail is June, whose brother is the one Day is accused of murdering. These two well-drawn and likeable (if not loveable) characters are the yin and yang that carry this trilogy to a delightful conclusion.  Legend is followed by Prodigy and concludes with Champion, each book stronger than the previous.

 

 

proxy

Proxy, by Alex London

If you think the 1% are a problem now, in Proxy they are on steroids and the void between the haves and have-nots is gaping.  Alex London’s two book series, which begins with Proxy and concludes with Guardian is creative, compelling and wholly satisfying. Proxy begins a thrilling revolution in this dystopian world led by a gay teen named Syd.

 

 

 

 

grasshopperjungle

Grasshopper Jungle, by Andrew Smith

Dystopian need not be in the distant future, nor does it need to be serious. Austin and best friend Robby are our teen heroes who fend off six-foot-tall praying mantises while thinking all the thoughts a normal teen boy would be thinking. Sounds funny, and it is, this book is laugh-out-loud hilarious and a very original young adult novel. Destined to be a classic in the near future.

 

 

 

 

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Rebecca

Rebecca Brewer is an editorial assistant/professional geek at Ace and Roc. When not working she can be found attending a show, at band practice, and forcing her favorite books onto friends and loved ones.

 

 

 

dark

Dark Currents, by Jacqueline Carey

I knew from reading her previous books that Jacqueline Carey’s urban fantasy series would be good, but I didn’t realize how much fun it was! The small resort town where the series takes place effortlessly blends many different paranormal creatures who make up the tight community.  With action, romance, and Carey’s imagination, this is the start to an amazing series.

 

 

 

 

night

Night Owls, by Lauren M. Roy

When I read Night Owls, a fantastic ensemble urban fantasy about a vampire who owns a bookstore and her group of friends, I knew I had to have it. If you’re looking for characters as vivid as those in Game of Thrones, and a new take on paranormal creatures, you have to read Night Owls.

 

 

 

 

 

midnight

Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris

Charlaine Harris is one of the best authors at combining genres, and this just cements her place as the master. This is a perfect blend of mystery and urban fantasy, with a fantastic setting that makes me nostalgic for my small town Texas home, though it’s just a bit more mysterious.

 

 

 

 

 

maplecroft

Maplecroft by Cherie Priest

I’ve been counting down the days until this book is released and I can discuss it with others. In this perfectly atmospheric historical fantasy, Lizzie Border (with her axe) is fighting against something monstrous attacking people in Fall River. This is a perfect novel for those who love the Lovecraft mythos.

 

 

 

 

black wings

Black Wings, by Christina Henry

If a personable Agent of Death who guides soul to the afterlife isn’t enough to convince you to read this book, perhaps a very attractive (and potentially troublesome) neighbor will, along with a hilarious gargoyle with a penchant for junk food. The action packed plot and the fantastic voice will make any urban fantasy fan happy.

 

 

 

 

bloodring

Bloodring, by Faith Hunter

Most people encounter Faith Hunter’s work through her Jane Yellowrock series, but I fell in love with her book Bloodring first. It’s the first in her Rogue Mage series where Seraphs and Demons fight battle while the remaining humans must use their wits and our main character, a mage, fights for the ones she loves. Dark, exciting, and passionate, with an overarching mystery and an upcoming battle on the horizon.

 

 

 

 

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Erica

Erica Martirano is the associate director of marketing for Berkley, Celebra, DAW Books, and InterMix. In her spare time she harasses the editors for early manuscripts on her favorite books (a publishing perk!) and has been known to pester the NAL publisher in particular for JR Ward. To date the publisher has not acquiesced.

 

 

Lover Awakened

Lover Awakened, by JR Ward 

I’ll admit it—I’m a JR Ward junkie and basically love everything she does—but this is a standout favorite of mine throughout the entire BDB series. Zsadist’s story never fails to literally bring me to tears (something my husband will never stop making fun of me about), and is really where I got hooked on the story of the brothers.  Of all the brothers, he’s the most damaged, and before you know it, you’re rooting for Bella to help try to repair him. The series as a whole really just rocks, but if you read nothing else JR Ward you have to read this one!

 

 

 

Dragon Bound

Dragon Bound, by Thea Harrison

This book is unfairly good.  Like, slap-the-person-who-wants-to-talk-while-you’re-reading good. Pia Giovanni is blackmailed into stealing a relic from one of the most powerful members of the Elder Races, Dragos Cuelebre, and the romance that develops between the two of them basically sets the pages on fire.  This is an outstanding start to a series and somehow manages to make DRAGONS sexy!

 

 

 

 

Blood Games

Blood Games, by Chloe Neill

Before everyone starting thinking I only do the romances…the Chicagoland Vampires series is AMAZING, and Blood Games is no exception.  Merit is a vampire, Sentinel of Cadogan House in Chicago, and she basically kicks all sorts of ass, humans and paranormal creatures alike.  In this installment, a killer is going after the human population in Chicago and leaving his victims with magical souvenirs.

And okay, she also has a super hot boyfriend, Ethan, who’s the head vampire of the house.  But these are completely urban fantasy books, so if you like your heroines bold and with a sword, Chicagoland is for you!

 

Night Broken

Night Broken, by Patricia Briggs

The Mercy Thompson novels are like chips—you can’t have just one!  I just started reading this series this year and zipped through the eight of them in what felt like a week.  Mercy’s another badass heroine, a shapeshifting VW mechanic who somehow manages to find herself in sticky situations.  Here, her mate’s ex is being stalked by a paranormal creature leaving bodies all over the Tri-Cities of Washington state, and Mercy needs to put aside her personal feelings in order to stop him.  It also doesn’t hurt that the cover art on these books is absolutely fantastic—Dan Dos Santos is a master!

 

 

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Mia

Mia Garcia has worked for Penguin for 5 crazy years. She also runs Facebook.com/DestinationElsewhere, which you should totally join.

 

 

 

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, by April Genevieve Tucholke

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, by April Genevieve Tucholke 

I could go on for hours about Between the Devil: its rich atmospheric language, its seductive yet infuriating characters, its complicated romances…I LOVE IT. The novel follows Violet White’s life in a crumbling estate as eerie and grim things start to happen. Could they be tied to the mysterious new tenant that has taken residence in her guesthouse? Does it matter when that tenant is a dark-haired boy who takes naps in the sun, who likes coffee, who’s crooked grin makes you want to kiss him? (The answer is maybe, guys, maybe) Tucholke’s debut novel is addicting and seductive and I highly recommend it.

 

Paper Valentine, by Brenna Yovanoff

Paper Valentine, by Brenna Yovanoff 

The city of Ludlow is gripped by the hottest July on record.  The asphalt is melting, the birds are dying, and someone in Hannah Wagnor’s peaceful community is killing girls. Oh and did I mention that her best friend Lillian died six months ago, and has been haunting Hannah’s life ever since, pushing her to investigate the string of murders? There’s also the must-stop-thinking-about-him delinquent Finny Boone who keeps popping up into her life. The combination of a slow-burning mystery and blossoming romance make Paper Valentine a complex tale of love and death and is one of my favorites from Yovanoff yet!

 

 

Sweep- Book of Shadows, The Coven, and Blood Witch Volume 1, by Cate Tiernan

Sweep series, by Cate Tiernan 

I love the SWEEP series so much I keep a set in my office just to give away to people whenever they are looking for a quick, addicting read. Morgan Rowlands never thought she was anything other than a typical 16-year-old girl until a romance with a guy named Cal reveals that she is a witch – a very, very powerful witch, which of course means secrets, trouble and talk of soul mates. It’s impossible to explain how addicting this series is, once you start you’ll devour book after book.

 

 

 

Vampire Academy Box Set 1-6, by Richelle Mead

Vampire Academy Series, by Richelle Mead 

Richelle Mead knows how to spin an addicting series. SHE KNOWS. From the Vampire Academy series to the current Bloodlines series, her books are fast paced and hard to put down. Though I love both series, I want to recommend the series that started it all: Vampire Academy. Rose Hathaway is a Dhampir, a bodyguard for her best friend Lissa, a Moroi Vampire Princess. I know, I know, vampires are so 90s, 00s, etc WHO CARES THIS SERIES IS AWESOME. And Rose is kick-butt and makes mistakes and often punches people in the face before having a conversation. The series is well written, filled with action, strong female friendships, romance and mystery.  What more do you want?

Dark Currents - Agent of Hel, by Jacqueline Carey

Dark Currents, by Jacqueline Carey

Dark Currents was such a fun romp! I read the first two books in less than a week and can’t wait for the third in the series. It follows the day-to-day life of one Daisy Johanssen, hellspawn and local enforcer to the ancient deity living underneath her town, as she struggles to keep the human and the…not so human from destroying each other and the town. Dark Currents reminded me a lot of the earlier Sookie Stackhouse books with its humor and quick pacing. It’s an excellent start to what will surely be a treat of a series.

 

 

 

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Julie

Julie works with romance and women’s fiction at the Berkley imprint of Penguin Random House. She lives in Brooklyn and is a big fan of MTV True Life and thunderstorms.

 

 

 

True, by Erin McCarthy

True by Erin McCarthy

I love a great good girl/bad boy story, and this one is set on a college campus, with really smart, believable protagonists. The university details make me nostalgic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Hundred Summers, by Beatriz Williams

A Hundred Summers by Beatriz Williams

I give this one the title of “My Favorite Beach Read.” It’s got an impossible love story, family drama, great New England historical detail, and an impending hurricane, which gives the whole thing an ominous, atmospheric feel.

 

 

 

 

 

V!RG!N, by Radhika Sanghani

V!RG!N by Radhika Sanghani

This book made me laugh embarrassingly loud on the subway. It’s like Bridget Jones for the 20-something set – so accurate and so so funny.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Smuggler Wore Silk by Alyssa Alexander

The Smuggler Wore Silk by Alyssa Alexander

I’m a TINY bit biased because I’m the editor of this book, but I personally think it’s historical romance at its best; strong heroine, dashing hero, and just the right amount of suspense.

 

 

 

 

 

 

While They Were Watching Downtown Abbey by Wendy Wax

While They Were Watching Downtown Abbey by Wendy Wax

Although there’s lots of romance to be found here, to me the heart of this novel is all about the power, strength, and love behind female friendships.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hemingway’s Girl by Erika Robuck

Hemingway’s Girl by Erika Robuck

Hemingway is one of my favorite classic authors, and this book made me feel like I was living in Depression-era Key West right alongside him and his conflicted (fictional) love interest, Mariella.

 

 

 

 

 

Deception Cove by Jayne Castle

Deception Cove by Jayne Castle

Jayne Ann Krentz (writing here as Jayne Castle) always gets it just right in her books, but I think she’s at her most fun in this futuristic series set on paranormal-tinged Rainshadow Island. The heroine of this one, Alice, is super witty and badass.

 

 

 

 

 

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Kristine

Kristine Swartz is an editorial assistant at The Berkley Publishing Group, where she deals primarily (and happily) with all sorts of romance and paranormal books.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Omens, by Kelley Armstrong

Omens, by Kelley Armstrong

You can never go wrong with Kelley Armstrong. I’ve been a huge fan of hers since I started reading her Otherworld series back in high school. Omens in particular is a compelling, atmospheric read. Just take a peek at the Prologue, and you’ll see exactly what I mean! This is a series to watch.

 

 

 

 

 

Iron Duke, by Meljean Brook

The Iron Duke by Meljean Brook

This was one of the first steampunk romances I ever read, and it is still a favorite of mine. Meljean expertly balances complex world-building with authentic romance and adventure. The fourth book in this series, The Kraken King, is coming out as a serial in April, and I, like all her other fans, will be anxiously awaiting each installment!

 

 

 

 

Heart of Obsidian, by Nalini Singh

Heart of Obsidian by Nalini Singh

Nalini is a mastermind at plotting! Each Psy/Changeling book builds on the last one in such an intricate and immensely satisfying way. Even though I have access to galleys of Shield of Winter, the next in the series, I’m waiting until the hardcovers arrive so I can take a copy home and keep it forever! (I get a little protective over these books).

 

 

 

 

Lover At Last, by J.R. Ward

Lover At Last by J.R. Ward

I was so happy when I heard whose book this would be—J.R. Ward sowed the seeds for this novel years ago! I became really attached to Blay and Qhuinn when they were secondary characters, so it made reading their book even more special. I’m all for two hot guys falling in love!

 

 

 

 

 

Murder of Crows, by Anne Bishop

Murder of Crows by Anne Bishop

The first book in this series, Written in Blood, was so unique that I just had to read the sequel as soon as it was available. You won’t find characters like these in another book, or a world quite like this. If you’re in the mood for something that is a little dark and different, then try this series!

 

 

 

 

 

Bitter Spirits, by Jenn Bennett

Bitter Spirits by Jenn Bennett

What an intoxicating read (pun intended)! Jenn Bennett weaves together a story filled with all of my favorite things: speakeasies, spirits and sexy bootleggers! This is a new series that I will be closely following. Luckily I know the editor and have already called dibs on a copy of the sequel, Grim Shadows, when the book releases in June.

 

 

 

 

Generation V, by M.L. Brennan

Generation V by M.L. Brennan

Generation V straddles the line between being paranormal and urban fantasy, but I love it so it’s on my list of favorites! The main character is probably the least excited vampire-to-be that every existed, but he handles his plight with so much charm and quirk that I can’t help but root for him. Although I’m still undecided on whether or not I want him to become a vampire or remain (mostly) human.

 

 

 

 

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Colleen

Colleen is Associate Director of Marketing, Social Media & Reader Experience for Penguin’s Berkley and NAL Publishing Groups. She has been a professional nerd since 1984.

 

 

 

Daughter of the Sword, Steve Bein

Daughter of the Sword by Steve Bein:

Daughter of the Sword is a debut novel that doesn’t fit neatly into any category, but it’s exactly that originality that made this one of my favorite novels of last year. A skillful blend of Japanese historical fantasy, urban fantasy, and contemporary police procedural, and Bein’s protagonist Mariko Oshiro – the only female detective in Tokyo’s most elite police unit – is a wonderful addition to the ranks of urban fantasy heroes.

 

 

 

 

Neuromancer, by William Gibson

Neuromancer by William S. Gibson:

Neuromancer is a classic science fiction title now celebrating its 30th anniversary. It won the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Philip K. Dick Award, and was nominated for the British Science Fiction Award the same year. Gibson invented an entire genre with Neuromancer; its influence still reverberates throughout current pop culture. I read this when it first came out (yes, I’m that old!) and have never been able to get Gibson’s vision of the future out of my head.

 

 

 

Among Thieves by Doug Hulick

Among Thieves by Doug Hulick:

I read this just a few weeks ago, while prepping for a panel I’ll be moderating with the author next month, and I absolutely loved it! Imagine a town very much like Shakespeare’s Verona, run by a hierarchy of thieves, spies, rogues, and assassins, throw in some magic with sensible rules, a little ribald good humor, a quest for a forbidden object, and a lot of excellent swordplay, and, well, basically you’ve got Among Thieves. Hulick is a wonderful world-builder and his characters will stay with you long after you finish the book. Enjoy!

 

 

 

The Thousand Names, by Django Wexler

The Thousand Names by Django Wexler:

An utterly compelling military-themed epic fantasy with characters that become more complex and more believable the deeper you delve into the novel. Wexler sets his story in Khandar, an arid land reminiscent of nineteenth-century Sudan, where unrest is brewing against the foreigners who long-ago colonized their country, and the desolate Colonial soldiers left behind to police the citizens. Wexler brilliantly melds the horror of combat with the politics of colonialism, giving the reader reasons to care for characters on both sides of the conflict. An exceptional debut novel!

 

 

Skinwalker, by Faith Hunter

Skinwalker by Faith Hunter:

I love urban fantasy, and Faith Hunter’s Jane Yellowrock series is one of my favorites in this genre. Jane Yellowrock is a skinwalker of Cherokee descent, and the last of her kind. Jane shares her body with the soul of a mountain lion she calls Beast, and the conversations between Jane and Beast – conversations that take place inside Jane’s head! – are some of the best and most human parts of these books. There’s also a cast of vampires, weres, and bad-boy love interests, but the true heart of these books is the relationship between Jane and Beast. Start with Skinwalker and work your way through the whole series. Just trust me on this!

 

 

Midnight Crossroad, by Charlaine Harris

Midnight Crossroad by Charlaine Harris:

Charlaine Harris leaves Bon Temps and Sookie Stackhouse behind in Midnight Crossroad, the first in a brand-new series set in the town of Midnight, Texas.  At its heart, Midnight Crossroad is a murder mystery, and Harris draws heavily on her roots as a mystery writer here, mixing small-town eccentricities with darker paranormal elements to create a quirky town where most of the residents have something to hide. I confess to tearing through this book in about a day, missing several subway stops on the way to work (sorry boss!) to read the last chapter. I can’t wait to see what the fine folks of Midnight get up to next!

Watch the exciting book trailer here!

 

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This holiday season, our Penguin authors can help you find the best book for everyone on your list.

View more holiday recommendations on the Random House Tumblr.

Charlaine Harris is a New York Times bestselling author for both her Sookie Stackhouse fantasy/mystery series and her Harper Connelly Prime Crime mystery series. She has lived in the South her entire life.

I am particularly smitten with a novel when I think the writer has raised the bar on world-building. Luckily, I read several books this year that were really amazing in that respect; books that transported me to another place where the rules are different.

Written in Red by Anne Bishop was fascinating from start to finish. In her world, humans and “others” do interact — but very, very, carefully. Her heroine, caught in the middle and running from trouble, is totally engaging. Benedict Jacka’s Chosen, a continuation of the adventures of mage Alex Verus, exposes the lead character (warts and all) in a milieu where magic is hidden in plain view and survival is never a given.

I’m still thinking about E.E. Knight’s Appalachian Overthrow, the latest entry in the really superior Vampire Earth series. Overthrow has a different protagonist, a Golden One, but his part of the revolution trying to reclaim America is just as compelling as Knight’s usual human protagonist, David Valentine. I’m not an enthusiast over military science fiction, but these books are enthralling.

Ben Aaronovitch’s Broken Homes is part of his modern London series about a policeman who finds he has magic powers. Every book in this series is a winner, and Broken Homes is no exception. The only “magic” in Leigh Perry’s A Skeleton in the Family is that Perry’s protagonist, an adjunct professor named Georgia Thackeray, has a best friend named Sid . . . who is a skeleton who can walk and talk. It’s delightful, and I found Sid as credible a character as the humans around him.

Read an excerpt from Written in Red, by Anne Bishop »

Read an excerpt from Appalachian Overthrow, by E.E. Knight »


Seeing is BelievingAround the age of nine (give or take a few years) a lot of kids stop believing in the tooth fairy, the Easter bunny, Santa Claus, and the conviction that their parents are invincible and have all the answers.  In the Disney movie, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, they labeled it as the Age of Not Believing, and Angela Lansbury sings a tune to that affect.  It’s that transitional age from childhood to the teen years and it can be a tough and frankly, scary, time.  For the heroine in my March release, Seeing Is Believing, Piper Tucker never believed in fairy tales, given that she was raised by an abusive stepfather and abandoned at the age of eight.  But she did believe in ghosts, since they have always manifested to her.

Brady Stritmeyer believed Piper was telling the truth, just like he believed that his dreams for a better future lie outside of their small town and in the big city.  Now, fifteen years later, he has returned home to Cuttersville, dream shattered, to find that Piper has grown up and no longer talks to ghost, but still has a crush on him.

I’m a child of the eighties, and to me everything is an eighties song lyric, so I think Journey sums it up nicely by reminding us never to stop believing.  Sure, by the age of ten a bit of the wonderment of life has been knocked out of us by reality, but part of the journey (yes, that is a pun) is to recapture our awe as we pass beyond our teens and enter adulthood.  We learn to redefine what is means to believe in the mysteries and the magic of the world around us, and most of all, in ourselves.  We don’t need to see something to believe in it.  So while we can puzzle over the fact that the modern interpretation of Cupid is a rather bizarre chubby arrow-wielding kid in a diaper, we believe in the sentiment behind it: love.

If we don’t, we’ll have to answer to Steve Perry.