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Carole DeSanti is Vice President, Editor at Large for Viking and Penguin.  She is the also author of The Unruly Passions of Eugénie R., a novel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

paying

The Paying Guestsby Sarah Waters

Waters takes illicit love between women, passion and criminal intent to a whole new level with this story set in London high and low just after the close of the First World War. Waters leads us step by step from the mundane to the impassioned to the murderous through a  perilous landscape of secrecy and deceit —  a nail-biter to the last page.  This is an incredibly deft, smart novel – and packed with integrity and grit.

 

 

 

 

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The Lotus and the Storm, by Lan Cao

Here is a seriously beautiful book: bursting with life, the smell of the streets of Saigon, cry of street-vendors and the shock and terror of sniper fire on a leafy suburb of tamarind trees.  What we consider known history – the Vietnam War – is revealed in an entirely new light as Mai tells her story,  and Minh, a commanding general for the South, tells his. Lotus turns the dominant version of the war inside out and upside down, conveying a more complicated truth than we have known.  A searing, indelible novel by a brilliant woman – truly a life’s work from the heart, many years in the making.

 

 

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 A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki

Booker finalist, winner of the LA Times Book Prize, the Red Tentacle Prize, the Sunburst Award and other recognitions, A Tale has connected with a diverse and impassioned readership from science geeks to Zen priests….but this doesn’t take away from the extraordinarily personal, astounding experience of reading it. This kaleidoscopic and layered novel introduces Nao Yasutani, a 16 year old suicidal teenager in Tokyo;  her 104 year old grandmother Jiko (a Zen nun)  … a tsunami, a barnacled lunchbox washed up on a beach; quantum physics; the Friends of the Pleistocene and the poetry-reading kamikaze pilots of World War II — just for starters. Ozeki’s third novel is intricate, brilliant, and tells us a lot about compassion and meditation, too.

 

cascadeCascade, by Maryanne O’Hara

“What would you give up to become the person you were meant to be?” is one question Cascade asks, among others that have resonated with me since I turned the last page of this gorgeous, thoughtful and surprising page turner.  Cascade touches the heart of the matter for women artists and writers.  O’Hara explores her material by way of the story of Dez Hart, a Paris-trained, Boston painter who marries hastily and disastrously, then finds herself first chained to her husband’s conformity and rigid desires.  When the town they live in is scheduled to submerged under a reservoir – a history based on the story of the Quabbin in Western Massachusetts – Dez chooses to free herself as an artist, a lover, a woman – against terrible odds.

 

madame

Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert, translated by Lydia Davis

Flaubert’s masterpiece of realism (the  novel changed forever the way fiction was written, as Lydia Davis reminds us) is always worth a re-read, and this new translation is the perfect excuse.  Davis provides useful historical context for the novel, as well as details on its creation and publication – Flaubert’s painstaking writing techniques (many drafts, much discarding), the early censorship of the novel; Bovary’s subsequent bestseller-dom and elevation to classic status. The text itself is both faithful to the original and more precise historically, lending further pleasure and nuance to this always-magnificent, harrowing tale of a woman’s passionate desires and her disastrous fall.  (A perfect gift for the bibliophile in your life, especially the Penguin Drop Caps edition!)

trilogy

The All Souls Trilogy, by Deborah Harkness

It begins with A Discovery of Witches, continues with Shadow of Night and its grand finale is The Book of Life.  The Trilogy is now complete and a luscious romp from start to finish, taking up the tale of a spellbound witch and the sexiest 1,500 year old vampire ever to wander into a novel.  Bestselling fun with historical and literary heft, and  along the way we learn a lot about magic, too. (It’s all true, I think.) My favorite of the three volumes is Shadow, a sensuous and sweeping time-travel saga through the England of Shakespeare, Marlowe, and the alchemical laboratory of Mary Sidney.  A little bonus in the boxed set is Diana Bishop’s Commonplace Book, courtesy of the author and our design team at Viking.

 

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Brianna is the Executive Director of Publicity and Marketing for the Tarcher and Perigee imprints. She enjoys books that teach you something just as much as ones that entertain (science, pop psychology, “big think” books, romance, sci/fi-fantasy, food/cocktail books, coloring books—the gamut). She also loves good food, craft cocktails and shih-tzu puppies.

 

 

 

 

 

powerThe Power of Kindness, by Piero Ferrucci

When I was first applying for a job at Tarcher/Penguin six years ago, I picked up THE POWER OF KINDNESS, hoping to get a better sense of the type of book the imprint published. I knew it had been pretty successful for Tarcher, and though it wasn’t the type of book I would normally read (fiction, science or pop psychology), I figured I would give it a try. And I was blown away. Ferrucci packed so much wisdom into the simplest sentences, and he tells compelling stories and vignettes from people’s lives to illustrate his points. I found myself underlining passages and recommending the book to numerous friends. It didn’t surprise me to hear that the book sold nearly 100K copies almost entirely via word-of-mouth. No doubt, the world can use more kindness; people need to be kinder both to themselves and to others. In the new year, Ferrucci’s book is a fantastic place to start.

 

stronger

Stronger, Faster, Smarter, by Ryan Ferguson

I’m not into fitness gurus, but I’ve been working with Ryan Ferguson on this book, and I really like its no-nonsense approach. Ryan himself has an incredible story. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. He struggled for 10 years for his sentence to be overturned—which happened last year. While in prison, he honed his body and mind, knowing that he had to become his strongest, best self in order to survive. In this book, he weaves his lessons from prison together with the exercises and dietary practices that helped get him into peak condition. The book has helped me cut out a lot of the noise (things that I’ve read online about fitness and/or heard on the radio) and just focus on the essentials. That alone has made it one of the most useful books I’ve read so far this year!

 

energies of loveThe Energies of Love, by Donna Eden & David Feinstein

I was as skeptical as any New  Yorker would be when I first heard about ENERGY MEDICINE, Donna Eden’s bestselling book sharing energy medicine techniques. But then I saw Donna in action. Call her what you will – an intuitive, a magician or a healer (I prefer the latter) – but she can energy test a person and know what’s ailing them. And, even better, she can often give them tools that will help fix the problem. She’s also just full of positive energy and joy. With ENERGIES OF LOVE, she and her husband offer couples a new way of understanding each other – as well as energy medicine techniques to help them get on the same page. I recommend it to anyone who has a significant other.

 

whattheforkWhat the Fork Are You Eating?, By Stefanie Sacks

I’ve often wondered what “natural” really means on a food label – and whether this is regulated. And how “cage-free” differs from “organic.” I’m not a health food nut. In fact, I joke that with all the preservatives I’ve consumed over the years, I should be on this Earth for quite a while. However, the complexities of the food industry fascinate me – as does Sacks’ book. She’s a culinary nutritionist as well as a trained chef (and I’m a foodie), so I was drawn both to the book’s recipes (yum!) and simple “better for you” recommendations. I may ignore all of this advice during the holidays, but it’ll be my New Year’s resolution to refer back to it in January.

 

 

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The Myth of Happiness, by Sonja Lyubomirsky

Ever wonder why so many relationships fall apart after two years? Or why the things you thought should make you happy (more money, a promotion, etc.) don’t have staying power to keep you happy? Sonja’s book illuminates the way the mind works – and how our mindset (and our often black-and-white vision of happiness) hinders us. It’s a fascinating book, one that will have you contemplating some off-the-wall ideas – such as sky-diving with your partner or taking Tango lessons together – to keep that happy spark alive.

 

 

 

To find Health & Self-Improvement books, click here

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tomcolgan

Tom Colgan is an Executive Editor at Berkley Books. When he’s not reading for pay, he’s reading for play, and when he’s not doing that he’s sleeping. If your threshold for nonsense is high you can follow him on twitter @tomcolgan14.

 

 

 

 

 

 

lesserdeadThe Lesser Dead, by Christopher Buehlman

I’m probably stretching the definition of suspense to include this one, but I’ve been in love with Chris Buehlman’s writing since reading his first novel, Those Across the River. Like that book, The Lesser Dead, is a story of horror set against a historical backdrop. Since the setting here is 1970’s New York City, it’s the first historical novel set in an era of which I have first hand knowledge. Although, at the time the worst thing I had to deal with was the subway not vampires.

 

 

 

 

nightofwhite

Night of the White Buffalo, by Margaret Coel

Margaret Coel has written 18 mysteries about Jesuit priest John O’Malley and Arapaho attorney, Vicky Holden set against the backdrop of Wyoming’s Wind River reservation. The writing is so enthralling, the descriptions of the area so evocative and the characters so intriguing that several years ago when my family was planning a trip to the west I confessed to Margaret, “I started thinking about visiting my friends on the Wind River reservation only to realize, I don’t know anyone there.” I guess there is a (small) downside to writing this good.

 

 

 

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Suspect, by Robert Crais

The rules force me to pick one book per author so I’ll go with the latest from Robert Crais, but, really, you should read all of them (even the non-Penguin ones). He’s a master of suspense who never fails to deliver memorable characters and intense action.

What makes SUSPECT stand out from his other titles is that this time around his protagonist isn’t human. Maggie is a German Shepherd who lost her handler to an IED in Iraq and has been sent home with PTSD. Now with the LAPD, she’s labeled as unmanageable until she meets Scott James, an officer who was wounded in an attack that killed his partner. Now both he and Maggie are looking for a second chance, but they may be getting too close some very dangerous men. Dogs don’t have nine lives.

 

devil'sworkshopThe Devil’s Workshop, by Alex Grecian

As a former history major, I’m a big fan of historical thrillers, and, boy, they don’t come any better than Alex Grecian’s Murder Squad books. Set in Victorian-era Britain, these are tales of the early days of Scotland Yard and the fledgling science of criminal investigation. The first book, THE YARD, was great, but you could just feel the author building steam as he moved through the series. In THE DEVIL’S WORKSHOP a group of gentlemen vigilantes stage a prison break in order to get their hands on some particularly heinous criminals. However, things go badly wrong and instead of justice they get terror when they unexpectedly free the greatest evil Britain has ever seen, Jack the Ripper himself.

 

 

bookclubbedBook Clubbed, by Lorna Barrett

I can’t let you go without recommending a couple of good cozy mysteries. First up is BOOK CLUBBED by Lorna Barrett. Stoneham, New Hampshire is heaven for any bibliophile. It’s a booktown, a quaint village that has revitalized its tourism industry by turning empty storefronts over to used bookstores. People come from all over to browse, buy and eat at the various restaurants. Oh how I wish it was real!

It certainly feels like a visit to a familiar place when you are reading one of the charming Booktown mysteries from Lorna Barrett. Over the course of eight books, she’s introduced us to the quirky inhabitants of Stoneham which for all its appeal is murder on its residents. BOOK CLUBBED centers on something I’ve never come across before, murder by bookcase.

 

scorchedScorched Eggs, by Laura Childs

When it comes to cozies, you have to think of Laura Childs. She’s the author of not one, not two, but three bestselling cozy mystery series. Scorched Eggs is the sixth in her Cackleberry Club series. The small Midwestern town of Kindred is the home of the club, a combination café, bookstore, knitting shop and quilting supply store. That’s a lot to pack into one series, but Laura is adept at creating charming characters and placing them in jeopardy while keeping the story rollicking along.

 

 

 

 

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ZODIAC_EditorsDeskPhotoEvery morning at seven on the dot, an astrology website sends me an automated email containing my daily horoscope. Rare are the days when my fortune doesn’t begin with a caveat reminding me that, as a Sagittarius, I’m “known for [my] outspoken views and habit of saying exactly what’s on [my] mind,” or that I’m “the one who normally tells it like it is, regardless of others’ sensitivities,” or that “truth arrows are [my] negotiating tools.”

Well, I’d like to think that I’m more conscientious and have better self-control than my team of Internet astrologers seems to suggest, but when it comes to Zodiac by Romina Russell, I can’t help but be blunt. So, here’s a truth arrow for you:  Zodiac is breathtaking. And its debut author, Romina Russell, is a force to be reckoned with. The first novel in an epic YA series that reimagines the twelve zodiac signs as a galaxy divided into twelve distinct solar systems, Zodiac takes everything I love about astrology–the fun personality tidbits and dishy discussions about good fortune, bad omens, and romantic pairings both heaven-sent and disastrous–and marries it to thrilling sci-fi suspense and drama of big-screen blockbuster proportions. Add a quirky, charismatic cast of characters who hail from gleaming courts of Libra to the hot and happening streets of Aries, a mystifying villain, and a crazy-swoon-worthy yet completely out-of-the-box love story, and I’m in the biggest, coziest wingchair in Editor’s Heaven.

There’s so much that I, an unabashed astrology nerd with a weakness for adventures set in space, love about the Zodiac concept, but my favorite aspect of Romina’s stellar debut has got to be its heroine: the complex, compassionate, and exquisitely fallible Rho, a sixteen-year-old Acolyte from House Cancer. Rho has an unusual way of reading the stars–instead of calculating their positions to make practical predictions about her world, she looks to them the way a poet might, weaving stories out of the swishes of comet tails and using stardust patterns and pulsars to tell fortunes for her friends.

A true representative of House Cancer, which embodies such traits as nurturing, intuition, and loyalty, Rho thinks with her heart and acts from love. She’s a generous and open-minded friend (her bestie is an outgoing firecracker from House Sagittarius), and would do anything to help her home and her people. Still, softie though she is, Rho harbors haunting memories of a childhood marred by the sudden and unexplained departure of her mother. So instead of wearing her heart on her sleeve like the rest of her kind, she’s formed a shell to protect her sensitive soul–just like the Crab that rules her constellation. But when the exiled 13th Guardian of Zodiac legend returns to exact revenge on the Galaxy, the stars call upon Rho to lead House Cancer, and our girl rises to the occasion, hunting down evil with passion rather than wrath; instinct instead of instruction manuals. And guess what? In the end, she messes up. She messes up big time, and boy are there are consequences, and if I were to say more I would need to insert a big red SPOILER ALERT right about here. All I can say is that that Rho–a naïve and fallible dreamer from the most conflict-averse constellation in the Galaxy–is not your average heroine.

And then there is Romina. Romina and I actually first met as undergrads at Harvard, in a huge lecture class that may as well have been called “Math for English Majors,” back when Zodiac was still just one tiny twinkle in the constellation of Great Novel Ideas. Out of the couple hundred kids in that class, Romina–an infectiously charming and completely adorable young woman with a big smile and a razor-sharp wit–was randomly assigned to be my partner for a final group research project. We instantly hit it off, and it didn’t take long to decide on the irresistibly juicy human interest topic of Trends in Online Dating. And it turned out, we made a great team. Romina, a meticulous and ultra-organized Virgo, was the yin to my shoot-from-the-hip, incurably optimistic Sagittarian yang, and as we spent hours together interviewing couples, recording their personality types and measuring their predicted compatibility scores against their actual compatibility scores, a beautiful friendship was born.

ZodiacSeveral years later, a beautiful book was born. Romina presented me, armed as always with my quiver of truth arrows, with a stunning story about a girl from the galaxy of my dreams. And then something in the universe just clicked.

Start Reading an excerpt from Zodiac by Romina Russell!



SONY DSCAs an editor and a reader there’s nothing I love more than a book that gives me a true emotional experience. Often, that experience is laughter. I work on a lot of humor books, and people tell me all the time that the books I work on make them laugh. But Brooke Shields’s book, There Was a Little Girl, was the first book I’ve edited that made me cry – and not just once!

From the moment I learned Brooke wanted to write this book I knew it was going to be powerful. Her mother was a fascinating, controversial figure, and I’d already read about and was intrigued by her life story. But when Brooke came in to meet with us and told us about her experience of growing up with Teri Shields and all of their ups and downs – as well as the painful experience of letting her mother go in October 2012 – I just couldn’t believe how touching, and relatable the story was. No one in the world has had a life like Brooke’s, but the experiences and emotions she’s had are truly 100% relatable to anyone who has ever loved (and lost) a parent.

ThereWasALittleGirlBrooke and I worked together on the manuscript for the next nine months – an amount of time we both noted! – and it was an incredible experience. Brooke wrote the whole book herself, just as she did when she wrote Down Came the Rain, and her voice and emotions come through on every page. There are moments of incredible humor, but so many lines still choke me up and have literally moved me to tears. As both a daughter and a soon-to-be mother, this book has truly touched me in so many ways, and taught me so much about the power of love, even when it isn’t easy. I couldn’t be more excited to share Brooke and Teri’s story with the world!


staceybarneyphoto (1)Kristin Levine and I have worked together since her debut, The Best Bad Luck I Ever Had. I still remember that “I must have it!” feeling as I read her debut on submission. It was everything I love in a book—not only was it wonderfully written with humor and a voice that leaped off the page, but the characters were palpably real to me; they were the kind of characters that stay with you. And seven years later, I still reach to Dit and Emma for comfort or laughs. It was like that with Kristin’s second novel, The Lions of Little Rock, as well. Marlee and Liz were both girls I would have liked to have been friends with when I was that age—girls who had an interesting perspective on the world around them, girls I would have admired.

When Kristin introduced me to Tommy, the main character in The Paper Cowboy, she did so with trepidation. She said, “He might not be as likeable as my characters have been in the past; he’s a bit of a bully.” Well, I couldn’t imagine Kristin was capable of writing a character I didn’t like—bully or not, so I said send him on. I couldn’t wait to meet him.

Reading The Paper Cowboy for the first time was a wonderful and emotionally fraught experience. Just as I suspected, Kristin Levine was incapable of writing a character I didn’t like. In fact, I loved Tommy, immediately. I also worried over him, cried with him and even found myself darn right upset with him at times. But I also rooted for him, wanted to give him hugs and tell him it would be okay. Tommy wasn’t unlikeable. He was this charming, loveable, and yes mischievous boy, who sometimes made mistakes. But he also had a big heart and was capable of great kindness and generosity. He was nuanced and—as Kristin’s characters had always felt to me—incredibly real. Both his vulnerability and strength ran deep and his determination to turn it all around for not only himself, but also his family and his community was inspiring. Yet, he was still a character I knew other kids would see themselves in and through Tommy’s struggles and triumphs, they would know they could make an important difference for themselves or someone else.

More so in The Paper Cowboy than in her previous novels, Kristin doesn’t shy away from the tough stuff. Tommy’s mom is struggling with mental illness, his sister has been badly burned and hospitalized and Tommy feels tremendous guilt because of it, and there is an unnerving fear of communism running rampant throughout this Cold War era neighborhood. But the hope that also runs throughout the narrative is undeniable and wholly sustaining, making this a very rewarding read—as now three starred reviews give testament to.

ThePaperCowboyIf you’re like me as you read (and I hope you do!), you’ll simultaneously want to protect Tommy and set him straight. Ultimately, you’ll understand he has to find his own way through the tough stuff and when he does, he’ll make you immensely proud. He may even be one of those characters who restore your faith in the human spirit and people’s ability to change for the better. At least that’s what he did for me.

And that’s the magic of Kristin Levine. She breaks your heart and then helps you put it back together piece-by-piece and you’ll thank her for every bit of it. I’m very thankful for Tommy; he will be with me for a lifetime. Gosh, I can’t wait to see who Kristin will dream up next.


judy_murello

Judy Murello is an Executive Art Director in the Berkley Art Department handling all genre but especially the Ace list. She has worked at Penguin for oh such a long time. Before working at Berkley she was at NAL and was involved with the start of ROC.

 

 

 

 

The Raven’s Shadow trilogy by Anthony Ryan Blood Song, Tower Lord, and Queen of Fire (coming in July 2015)

bloodsongtowerlord

Anthony Ryan has created such a thrilling and engrossing epic tale. I just loved it! It’s just as good as the Song of Ice and Fire series by George R. R. Martin. Great characters encountering great challenges, with some heart-breaking results. And it has a satisfying conclusion. Read them!!

thoseacross

Those Across the River by Christopher Buehlman

This is a great book! One of my favorites. Don’t let the quiet set-up fool you. Let it lure you in and experience the strangeness that’s to come. Check out The Lesser Dead by Christopher too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

mooncalled

The Mercy Thompson and the related Alpha and Omega series, by Patricia Briggs

Beginning with Moon Called, this paranormal series just keeps getting better. Read both series, they go so well together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This isn’t out yet, but keep your eye out for…

Alice – Christina Henry (coming in August 2015)

This is a very unusual story that uses the Alice in Wonderland world in a unique way to tell a very different dark tale. Well written and surprising.

 

Find more books on the Science Fiction / Fantasy page

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Katherine Pelz photo

Katherine Pelz is an assistant editor at The Berkley Publishing Group, where she acquires romance, mystery and women’s fiction. During the rare moments when she’s not reading for business or pleasure, she’s in Brooklyn binge watching TV shows and hanging out with her cats.

 

 

 

 

 

spymaster

The Spymaster’s Lady, by Joanna Bourne

Joanna Bourne is, hands down, one of the best historical romance writers out there. Her writing, her characters, her settings, her plots…they are all THAT good. If you’re a historical romance reader and you’ve never read one of her Spymaster novels, you’re missing out on a master of the genre. Get your hands on a copy ASAP.

 

 

 

 

unwrapped

Unwrapped, by Maisey Yates

Small town contemporary romances are all the rage these days, and nobody writes one better than Maisey Yates. Her voice is fresh and ridiculously readable. UNWRAPPED is a holiday read that’s both hot and full of heart.

 

 

 

 

 

garden

The Garden of Letters, by Alyson Richman

Not strictly a romance, but a beautiful and moving historical novel that explores the pain and power of first love. It’s an experience that will stay with you long after you’ve read the final page.

 

 

 

 

 

exchange

Exchange of Fire, by P.A. DePaul

If you like some action with your romance, then you need to check out P.A. DePaul’s romantic suspense series. The heroine of Exchange of Fire is a sniper—I love a strong heroine (and a hero that can keep up with her!)

 

 

 

 

 

whenwemet

When We Met, by A. L. Jackson, Molly McAdams, Tiffany King and Christina Lee

I love reading New Adult romance, and WHEN WE MET contains stories from four of my top New Adult authors. You get four times the romance (and four times the hot heroes) with this one!

 

 

 

 

 

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isabel

Isabel Farhi is an editorial assistant at NAL/Ace/Roc, where she works on romance novels and science fiction & fantasy novels. When not at work, she watches anything with characters she can ship—and magic is an added bonus!

 

 

 

 

somegirlsbite

Some Girls Bite, by Chloe Neill

Paranormal equals vampires, and while I’m not usually a huge vampire fan I haven’t found better vampires than the Chicagoland vampires. Merit’s a grad student-turned-badass vampire, and she’s refreshingly human and fun to read. What’s really great about Chloe Neill is that her books just keep getting better as her world expands, and the twists and turns of her plots can last over books. But it always comes back to Merit and her vampire master/boss/lover, Ethan—who’s more than a little the attraction of these books as well!

 

 

 

writteninred

Written in Red, by Anne Bishop 

I was introduced to Anne Bishop years ago with her Black Jewels series, but this book plunged me back into her fan club, fast. As a history buff in my spare time, I loved how this book set up an alternate history and mythology where humans had always had to share their world with otherworldly creatures, and seeing how that changed our history—and even more, I loved seeing those otherworldly creatures interact with humans. Anne Bishops really captures the feeling that these beings are not human at all and they don’t think like us, and it makes for a fascinating, intense read.

 

 

Untitled-1On The Edge, by Ilona Andrews

Ilona Andrews is better known for her Kate Daniels series, but I really enjoyed this lesser known series. It’s nice to have a heroine who isn’t as blasé as some of the more jaded paranormal detectives—Rose is cynical, but she’s unsophisticated as well, and she’s learning things right along with the reader. None of which keeps her from being whip-smart, and more than a match for the powerful aristocrat who comes sniffing around. This world’s also a far cry from a lot of fantasy worlds—not only is it much more rural, set in the backwoods—but the magic system’s incredibly intriguing. It’s definitely world worth exploring! And the hero and heroine’s frustrated chemistry is really delightful.

 

 

heartofsteel

Heart of Steel, by Meljean Brooks 

The only thing better than pirates? Pirates in airships! The only thing better than pirates in airships? A female pirate captain who’s totally in charge and ruthless enough to stay there. And the only thing better than that? Watching her fall in love, and not get any weaker for it. I love subverting tropes, and the way this romance turns the pirate and his captor trope on its head makes it a great read. Their banter and constant one-upping contest just makes it better! With the adventure and swashbuckling as well as the romance to drive the story along, I couldn’t put this book down.

 

 

 

Find more books on the Paranormal page

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