ohsheglowsThis week is a busy one for us here at Avery/Gotham Books. We are all planning for our big VegWeek Celebration to take place April 21—27. We flipped through some of our favorite cookbooks, including Budget Bytes and The Oh She Glows Cookbook for some tasty vegetarian ideas. Below are some of the highlights we have planned:

BETH PARKER
Publicity

Everything in The Oh She Glows Cookbook looks amazing, but I might have to go with my old standby: Roasted Veggie Soup!

Chop 1 head cauliflower, 3 small (yellow) potatoes, 1 onion, 4 cloves of garlic, chopped up and roasted with garlic salt, pepper and olive oil at 450 for 45 mins, until everything is starting to brown plus approx. 3.5 -5 cups of veggie broth (homemade or canned) – throw it all in a blender and mix until smooth and the thickness you like. Serve with bread. Delicious.

It’s easy to prep at the last minute, delicious to eat and there are always leftovers – tastes great heated up the next day, too. And it is so filling! And cheap to make! (someone call Budget Bytes!)

P.S. – one time I made this with purple cauliflower. It looked super weird but tasted delicious.

LINDSAY GORDON
Publicity

With “Glowing Strawberry-Mango Guacamole” from Oh She Glows, I get to mix two of my favorite fruits into a guacamole for chips and dip – there couldn’t be a better combo. Can’t wait to munch on this all week!

EMILY WUNDERLICH
Editorial

I’ve made this recipe once before and loved it, so I’ll definitely be calling on it during Veg Week: it’s Angela Liddon’s Butternut Squash Sauce with Pasta and Greens, from her blog. It’s a vegan answer to mac n’ cheese, with a smoky, rich sauce that satisfies my comfort food cravings while being surprisingly virtuous (and also KALE!). Plus, this one freezes well for work lunches!

ANNE KOSMOSKI
Publicity

Call me a dreamer but I am really looking forward to making the Sweet-Potato & Black Bean Enchiladas with Avocado-Cilantro Cream Sauce. Pretty much all of my favorite things in one dish.  (Don’t worry, it looks like it takes more time to write the title than make the enchiladas). Addison and Avery (ages 3 and almost 1) are looking forward to Banana Soft Serve – we may even have to make it this weekend!

GIGI CAMPO
Editorial

I can’t wait to make Beth Moncel’s delicious Mango, Jalapeno & Quinoa Salad from Budget Bytes, and follow it up with Angela Liddon’s addictive Cacao Crunch Almond Butter-Banana Bites from Oh She Glows Cookbook! Very excited to go vegan and give my body—and the planet—a break.

FARIN SCHLUSSEL
Marketing

The 15-Minute Creamy Avocado Pasta from The Oh She Glows Cookbook has all of my favorite things: pasta, avocados, and basil pesto! I can’t wait to whip this up for dinner one day during VegWeek, although it looks so delicious that I’m pretty sure I’ll eat it in one go…


ohsheglowsWe were in the middle of our weekly publicity and marketing meeting and were discussing our New York Times bestselling Avery title, The Oh She Glows Cookbook and what we could do to celebrate this gorgeous and inspiring book by powerhouse vegan blogger Angela Liddon, when one of my colleagues made a suggestion.

“Maybe we should go vegan for a week.”

I’ll admit, my first thought was “How will I live without cheese?” But as we started to talk the idea through, the trepidation yielded to excitement. The recipes in The Oh She Glows Cookbook would provide everyone with more than enough delectable dishes to make it through the week (Chakra Caesar Salad! Easy Chana Masala! Chocolate Espresso Torte!), and the social media possibilities were endless, from sharing photos on Instagram and Twitter to getting Angela to tell her followers about our challenge.  When we started talking about taking it company-wide, I was all in.

And then we learned about US VegWeek, a weeklong celebration from April 21-27 that explores the many benefits of vegetarian eating—for our health, the planet, and animals. Restaurants and businesses across the country are set to promote the week, events (cooking demonstrations, movie screenings) are being held in major markets, and elected officials (Henry Waxman, Tammy Duckworth) are taking the 7Day VegPledge. It was a chance for us to be a part of something bigger and to give even more people a chance to get their glow on. We all promptly signed up and took the pledge.

Now, it’s your turn! Join us in the VegPledge, for one meal, or even the whole week and post photos of the vegetarian or vegan dishes you make on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr with the hashtag #USVegWeek. It’s going to be delicious!


Women have done amazing things for literature and have been an instrumental part in shaping the literature of today as well as the current publishing industry. In honor of National Women’s History Month we wanted to recognize these impressive women for all that they have done and will continue to do in the future.

There are too many amazing women, inspiring female characters, and wonderful authors to name, so instead I am going to discuss the ten books that have most inspired and/or deeply affected me in the last year. As a happy coincidence, ALL of these ten books were written by women. Today you get the second half. Check out My 10 Favorite Books from the Last 10 Months (Part 1) for the first half of this list.

The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd

This is hands down my favorite book (at the moment). It also happens to be one that truly encapsulates Women’s History Month. The Invention of Wings follows the lives of two women from opposing backgrounds. Sarah Grimke, the daughter of a wealthy family in early nineteenth century Charelston is given a present that alters her life. Meet Hetty “Handful” Grimke, an urban slave and Sarah’s eleventh birthday present. Kidd follows the lives of these two women from childhood into adulthood. We watch as they grow up, grow apart, and rebel against the lives they were born into.

What I think is particularly compelling about this book is that it looks at slavery from the slave, the slave owner, and the abolitionists perspectives all at once. On top of the slavery discussion, this book also looks at gender roles and the strict confines of society on women. Sue Monk Kidd presents an interesting comparison between abolitionism and women’s rights that is still relevant today. This is a book that I would recommend to anyone, but particularly to a female audience.

Sue Monk Kidd is also the author of The Secret Life of Bees, another book that I would recommend.

 

Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Counting by 7s, by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Coping with death and loss appears regularly in literature. This is a middle grade novel told from the perspective of twelve-year-old genius. Willow is not your average middle schooler, she is incredibly smart, and prefers her garden and her medical textbooks as opposed to other kids her age. When Willows adoptive parents both die in a car crash she is forced to come to terms with her parents’ death and her grief while simultaneously finding herself and her place in the new world she has been thrust into. Told through Willows’ unique, intelligent, and scientific-minded voice we follow along as this young girl turns her grief into a discovery rather than a tragedy.

I bet you were not expecting to find a middle grade novel on this list, and I can assure you that when I picked it up for the first time I was not expecting this book to be in my Top Ten either. But the surprise is what makes this book so special.

 

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

What Alice Forgot, by Liane Moriarty

What Alice Forgot is the saddest books that I have ever read and I like sad books so that is saying a lot. I’m a fan of any book that I am still thinking about days, weeks, and months later and this book is exactly that!

Married couples splitting up have become the norm. Divorce rates are high. I am just entering the phase of life where weddings are a regular event. I have been told to enjoy this “wedding phase” while it lasts because after that comes the “kid phase,” and then the “divorce phase.” What Alice Forgot deals with all of these three phases of life. Alice has amnesia. She wakes up in the middle of a ugly divorce and her children are in their early teens. However in Alice’s head, she is a newlywed, floating in marital bliss, and pregnant with her first child. She is quite confused, as you might imagine.

Moriarty magnifies both of these two pivotal times by examining how Alice fell in and out of love. I am a fast reader and I like to start and finish a book all in the same week. This book took me a while. I found myself regularly having to stop and think about what I had just read, for a day and often for a week. This is a difficult book to read in one sitting and is not necessarily one to take on vacation. What Alice Forgot will make you pause and really think about the ways we treat others and ourselves.

 

Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi

Ghana Must Go, by Taiye Selasi

Every book on this list is here for a reason and Ghana Must Go is here for several, one of which being that it may be the most beautifully written book that I have read in my life.

Kweku Sai, a divorced father of four and renowned surgeon, is dead. His death starts the ripple of events that bring his estranged family slowly back together. Secrets and disappointments have drawn the family apart over time and it takes the death of their father to bring them back together. This novel looks at the unconditional love of family and “teaches that the truths we speak can heal the words we hide.”

This is a book that spans generations, moving seamlessly through time, point of view, and voice as it looks at how a single family grew up, grew apart, and what it took to bring them back together. Taiye Selasi is a beautifully eloquent writer who I cannot wait to read more of.

 

Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan

Golden Boy, by Tara Sullivan

This is a book truly unlike any other I have ever read. Golden Boy looks at the life of thirteen-year-old Habo, who is growing up in a small Tanzanian village. His father abandoned the family because he could not accept his son. His mother will not look at him. His brother terrorizes him. The other children in the village have never asked him to play. Habo is alone and different. When Habos’ family is cast out of their village, he knows his yellow hair, light eyes, and white skin is the reason why. As his family travels across the Serengeti in order to seek refuge in Mwanza, Habo discovers his curse has a name: Albino, and there are people hunting him.

When I think of oppression and discrimination, in terms of history, there are three things that come to mind: slavery, women’s rights, and the holocaust. Maybe this is because I commonly have more access to books that discuss these issues, maybe it is because these are common topics in literature, but it is both refreshing and upsetting when you come across a case of discrimination as graphic and disturbing as the one discussed in this book. Particularly when you did not previously know it existed.

Golden Boy is a Young Adults book and while aimed at a younger audience, was one of the more enlightening and educational books that I have read this year.


Women have done amazing things for literature and have been instrumental in shaping the literature of today. In honor of National Women’s History Month, we wanted to recognize these impressive women for all that they have done and will continue to do.

There are too many amazing women, inspiring female characters, and wonderful authors to name. So instead, I am going to discuss the ten books that have most inspired and/or deeply affected me in the last ten months. As a happy coincidence, ALL of these books were written by women. Today however you only get the first five. Check back on Thursday, March 20th for the second half of this list.

 

All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry

All the Truth That's In Me by Julie Berry

No matter how old I get, I will never give up reading Young Adult books. The main reason being that these books tackle issues that are often left to fall to the background in adult novels. All The Truth That’s in Me is an intriguing take on a number of these timeless and important issues.

This book captivated me with its characters, its plot, and most strongly by means of its literary themes and implications. Judith Finch, disappears as a young girl. She is not seen for years until one day, now in her teens, she returns, mute. The reason for her disappearance and sudden return are shrouded in dark secrecy. Judith is ostracized by her community. She becomes the lowest of creatures in her town due to the question of her “purity.” I will not give anything else away, but I would strongly encourage this book to readers of all ages, Young Readers, Mature Readers, and all those in between.

 

Dear Life: Stories by Alice Munro

Dear Life, by Alice MunroLiving in NYC, the subway is a major component of my daily routine. Working in publishing, reading also makes up a significant portion of my day. It’s only natural that I would combine the two. Having finished my previous book that morning, I chose a book at random off my work shelf. This book happened to be Dear Life. Knowing nothing about Alice Munro or the book itself I got on the subway that evening, opened to page one, and began. I was so engrossed in this book, its dozens of characters, and its plethora of stories that I got on the wrong connection home and again the following day. If that doesn’t signify a good book I don’t know what does!

In a collection of short stories, Alice Munro looks at the moment in a person’s life that changes it forever. This is a fascinating read that speaks to the human condition, the ways in which we interact with one another, and the choices that forever alter our futures.

 

Just One Day & Just One Year by Gayle Forman

Just One Day, by Gayle FormanJust One Year, by Gayle Forman

Two for the price of one! What was the last book that stood up and smacked you across the face? For me, both Just One Day and its sequel Just One Year did exactly that. Now, I will admit that these books are not ground breaking in their originality of plot, but they are beautifully unique in their format. Told from opposite view points, Just One Day tells the story of Allyson Healey, and the twenty-four hours that transform her life. Just One Year, the second in the series, tells of Williem and the year that follows that life altering day.

This is one of those love stories that shatters your heart before slowly piecing it back together. This book had me rushing to the next page, dreaming (literally) about what might happen next, crying in public places, and has me still thinking about it eight months later. This is not just the love story of two people, but a love story between the individual and the world. These books follow two teenagers as they fall in love with the world.

This is a perfect book for spring and will stir up extreme feelings of wanderlust. Consider yourself warned! Clear your calendar, pick a beautiful day, gather your supplies (chocolate and tissues are a must), find a comfy patch of grass, spread your blanket, and prepare for an emotional journey that will take you to all the corners of the Earth!

 

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir by Jenny Lawson

Let's Pretend This Never Happened, by Jenny Lawson

Never underestimate a good laugh! This book is hilarious; there simply is no other word. This book has a Taxidermy Shakespearian mouse on the cover . . . it was predestined to be a book of genius and I loved EVERY. SINGLE. PAGE.

For those people out there who are like me you have spent the last several months reading Memoir after Memoir. No, that’s not how you spent your winter? Regardless, my advice to you at this moment is to a.) Go get this book and b.) Be very content with your life. Prepare to be stared at in public for uncontrollable fits of laughter.

 


The Grapes of Wrath 75th Anniversary Edition, by John Steinbeck

Today, 27 February, is the 112th birthday of the great American writer John Steinbeck. Over the course of his long career, Steinbeck won the Pulitzer and Nobel prizes and wrote some of the country’s most essential works taught in schools and read by millions.

April 2014 marks the 75th anniversary of the first Viking hardcover publication of Steinbeck’s crowning literary achievement. First published in 1939, Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize–winning epic of the Great Depression chronicles the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s, telling the story of the Joads, an Oklahoma farm family driven from their homestead and forced to travel west to the promised land of California.

 

 

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Elda Rotor, Editorial Director for Penguin Classics, on THE GRAPES OF WRATH:

“There are five layers in this book, a reader will find as many as he can and he won’t find more than he has in himself.” This is how Steinbeck described his novel, a blunt challenge to the reader, and it’s a line that I think about often when it comes to how we encounter classics such as The Grapes of Wrath. Those layers are both very personal and yet universal, and in my experience, when the intersections and the layers become clear, for instance, in scenes of Ma fighting to maintain her family’s dignity as their welfare worsens, and in her exchanges with her daughter Rose of Sharon, it shakes you to your foundation. The Grapes of Wrath demands your slow and thoughtful read and you’ll be grateful for discovering those layers and what Steinbeck’s tremendous work provides.

WORKING DAYS by John Steinbeck

The journal, like the novel it chronicles, tells a tale of dramatic proportions—of dogged determination and inspiration, yet also of paranoia, self-doubt, and obstacles. It records in intimate detail the conception and genesis of The Grapes of Wrath and its huge though controversial success. It is a unique and penetrating portrait of an emblematic American writer creating an essential American masterpiece.

East of Eden, by John Steinbeck

Ryan Murphy, Marketing Assistant for Penguin Books, on EAST OF EDEN:

To me there is no more enduring scene in John Steinbeck’s work than that of East of Eden’s Sam, Adam and Lee discussing, with sincerity and gravity, the meaning of the Cain and Abel story. Deep in this incredibly rich novel, the simplest of elements—a single Hebrew word, timshel, “thou mayest”—becomes the pivot upon which the ethical heart of the narrative turns. In the context of Steinbeck’s messy and brutal world, such humble concepts or acts—like Rose of Sharon’s selfless offering at the close of The Grapes of Wrath or the quiet small-town war resistance of The Moon Is Down—often have the deepest repercussions. (include book cover)

 

THE WAYWARD BUS by John Steinbeck

In his first novel to follow the publication of his enormous success, The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck’s vision comes wonderfully to life in this imaginative and unsentimental chronicle of a bus traveling California’s back roads, transporting the lost and the lonely, the good and the greedy, the stupid and the scheming, the beautiful and the vicious away from their shattered dreams and, possibly, toward the promise of the future.

BOMBS AWAY by John Steinbeck

A magnificent volume of short novels and an essential World War II report from one of America’s great twentieth-century writers. “This book is dedicated . . . to the men who have gone through the hard and rigid training of members of a bomber crew and who have gone away to defend the nation.” –John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men and The Moon Is Down, by John Steinbeck

OF MICE AND MEN AND THE MOON IS DOWN by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men represents an experiment in form, as Steinbeck put it, “a kind of playable novel, written in novel form but so scened and set that it can be played as it stands.” The Moon Is Down uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war and human nature. It tells the story of a peaceable town taken by enemy troops, and had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe. (include book cover)

 

 

 

More Books from Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck include:

THE PASTURES OF HEAVEN

THE LONG VALLEY

TORTILLA FLAT

IN DUBIOUS BATTLE


Redeployment, by Phil KlaySince August of last year, when I snapped this picture and shared it on my Instagram account telling readers that this is one book they won’t want to miss, I’ve been telling anyone who would listen about the upcoming Redeployment by Phil Klay.  Earlier that day, I’d been brought to tears in a pedicure chair within the first 20 pages, an admittedly odd position to be caught reading war fiction. By the end of the night the book was finished.

Redeployment, and war literature in general, is not my standard reading fare, but I trusted an editor’s recommendation and discovered a book that is so much more than I had expected it to be. Author Phil Klay takes a look at all of the lives touched by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—families, children, soldiers, and those who will find a veteran in their lives years after their deployment has ended. Interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival, the characters in these stories struggle to make meaning out of chaos.

Redeployment, by Paul Klay

Author and veteran Phil Klay has delivered something truly remarkable in his debut, and when asked, was happy to share his thoughts on war literature, and some of the key works in the genre for us.

The following content has been taken from an Interview with Shelf Awareness:

War literature has been its own special genre for some time now. What are some novels or stories you feel are authentic and valuable and worth recommending to readers? 

I don’t know if authenticity is always the first thing I’m looking for in literature, war related or otherwise. I wouldn’t call The Iliad an authentic portrait of the Trojan War any more than I’d call Richard III an authentic portrait of late 15th century English politics. Hasek’s WWI novel The Good Soldier Svejk isn’t particularly interested in being realistic, so I don’t know how it fares on the question of authenticity, but it does have the virtue of being incredibly good. I’d like to think my book is authentic. I did a lot of research and talked to a lot of vets in order to get things as right as I could, but my ultimate aim was to do more than just achieve some kind of verisimilitude.

I’ll say this. Reading Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim was important to me and it informed my thinking while writing this book. That’s not really a war book, though. Then there’s Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry. Anthony Powell’s A Dance to the Music of Time. Seamus Heaney’s North and Station Island. Colum McCann’s TransAtlantic is less about war than about the work of crafting peace, but it’s a book I’ve thought about a lot since I finished reading it. Beer in the Snooker Club, by Waguih Ghali, is not really a war book either, but there’s a long scene where two Egyptian characters go drinking with a British soldier that is also important to me. What else? Grant’s Memoirs. Tolstoy’s War and Peace. The war poetry of Kenneth Koch and James Dickey. Nathan Englander’s short stories. There’s plenty of great war or war-related writing.

Start Reading Redeployment by Phil Klay

Looking for more War Literature? A few more suggestions from the Penguin team:

Voices of the Pacific, by Adam Makos and Marcus Brotherton

A firsthand chronicle of United States Marine Corps’ actions in the Pacific. Following fifteen Marines from the Pearl Harbor attack, through battles with the Japanese, to their return home after V-J Day, Adam Makos and Marcus Brotherton have compiled an oral history of the Pacific War in the words of the men who fought on the front lines.

Civilian Warriors, by Erik Prince

Forget everything you think you know about Blackwater. And get ready for a thrilling, true story that will make you rethink who the good guys and bad guys have been since 9/11. Prince reveals new information about some of the biggest controversies of the War on Terror.

My Share of the Task, by General Stanley McChrystal

In this illuminating New York Times bestseller, McChrystal frankly explores the major episodes and controversies of his career. He paints a vivid portrait of how the military establishment turned itself, in one generation, into the adaptive, resilient force that would soon be tested in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the wider War on Terror.

Undaunted, by Tanya Biank

As she did so provocatively with military spouses in Army Wives, Tanya Biank gives us the inside story of women in today’s military—their professional and personal challenges from the combat zone to the home front…

Beyond Band of Brothers, by Dick Winters and Cole C. Kingseed

Now in paperback! The New York Times bestseller and war memoir from the commander of the legendary Band of Brothers––now with a new preface from Dick Winters.

Biggest Brother, by Larry Alexander

Full of never-before-published photographs, interviews, and Winters’s candid insights, Biggest Brother is the story of a man who became a soldier, a leader, and a living testament to the valor of the human spirit.

Call of Duty, by Lt. Lynn Compton and Marcus Brotherton

The national bestselling World War II memoir with a foreword by John McCain. This is the true story of a real-life hero.

Brothers in Battle, Best of Friends, by William Guarnere, Edward Heffron, and Robyn Post

Tom Hanks introduces the “remarkable” (Publishers Weekly) story of two inseparable friends and soldiers portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band of Brothers.

- Kristen O’Connell, Director of Consumer Marketing and Social Media


The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. LustigI made the baked oatmeal recipe on a Sunday morning, looking forward to eating it over the week. It seemed like a healthy and easy option and a little bit of a switch from my usual breakfast. I opted to make them into muffins, as the recipe notes give as an alternative, and I used frozen chopped peaches. It all came together in less than fifteen minutes, with ingredients I had ready in the pantry, and couldn’t have been easier to do. I also liked that this recipe uses no white flour, since I’m trying to cut back like everyone else and their gluten-free mother. The mixture pretty much filled a dozen muffin cups, but they do bake down some. They smelled wonderful, with the peaches, cinnamon, and vanilla. The measurements for the cinnamon and vanilla might seem like a lot, especially to experienced bakers, but you really do need them since there is (naturally) not much sugar in the recipe. To eat, I mixed Greek yogurt with a little honey and then crumbled a muffin into it. This is definitely not sweet (sorry to all the flavored oatmeal lovers out there), but the oats and fruit have a nice flavor, which I found improved the day after baking, and I enjoyed it with the yogurt.
BAKED FRUIT OATMEAL
Ingredients:
3 cups old-fashioned rolled oats2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

2 teaspoons baking powder

2 tablespoons brown sugar or honey (optional)

1 teaspoon salt

1. cups unsweetened soy milk (2 percent milk is also OK)

1 pound sweet apples, diced

2 tablespoons rice bran, coconut, or safflower oil

2 large eggs, or 4 large egg whites (save the yolks for another use)

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

STEP 1: Preheat the oven to 350°F.

STEP 2: Spray a 9-by-9-inch baking pan with cooking oil.

STEP 3: Combine the rolled oats, cinnamon, baking powder, brown sugar, if using, and salt in a medium-size bowl.

STEP 4: Combine the soy milk, apples, oil, eggs, vanilla, and honey, if using, in a large bowl. Add the oat mixture and mix well. Pour the oatmeal batter into the prepared baking pan.

STEP 5: Bake the oatmeal on the middle rack until the center is set and firm to the touch, 45 minutes.

Cool for 10 minutes, cut and serve. Can be served at room temperature. Covered, it will keep in the refrigerator for up to three days.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

VARIATIONS:

• Make muffins using a nonstick muffin pan that makes 12. The baking time will be 25 minutes.

• Use fresh or frozen chopped peaches, about 2 fresh peaches or 1 cup frozen, in place of the apples.


The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

This weekend I made two recipes from Rob Lustig’s new book THE FAT CHANCE COOKBOOK. It’s not as cold as the polar vortex right now but it’s still chilly and I was happy to test out Old-Fashioned Beef Stew and Quick Chicken Tikka Masala. Both recipes were very easy to follow with simple ingredients and I was lucky enough to check out the new Brooklyn Whole Foods in Gowanus to stock up. The stew took longer to make than I expected – all the chopping of the vegetables added up to about an hour but the rest of the evening I spent letting it simmer (for three house) while catching up on Game of Thrones, so I can’t complain!

The Tikka Massala came together very quickly and the spices were delicious – I was a little disappointed that it didn’t turn out as vibrant and red as the chicken tikka masala I usually order in from a nearby Indian place but I felt good about the ingredients and as Rob points out I’m sure it was much healthier! Hardly any fat and I used chicken thighs to add flavor – they are so much more delicious than the chewy bits of chicken that come in fast food Indian orders. And the best part is I’ve been enjoying the many leftovers from both dishes for lunch all week.


OLD-FASHIONED BEEF STEW AND VEGETABLES

Ingredients

½ cup oil: olive, safflower, or rice bran

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped and peeled onions

1 cup chopped carrots

1 teaspoon dried thyme, or 1 tablespoon fresh thyme

4 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour

1 1/2 pounds beef stew meat

8 cups liquid (water, wine, stock, or a mixture)

1 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon cracked black pepper

2 cups 1-inch pieces scrubbed carrots or parsnips

2 cups scrubbed diced potatoes

STEP 1: Heat 1/4 cup of oil in a cast-iron or stainless steel pot. (Make sure it has a tight-fitting lid.) Saute the celery, onions, carrots, thyme, and garlic in the pot until brown and tender. When aromatic vegetables are brown, remove them from the pot with a slotted spoon and reserve in a small bowl.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

STEP 2: Place the flour in a bowl. Dredge the meat, shaking off the excess flour. Add the remainder of oil to the pot and cook the meat over medium-high heat, quickly browning but not cooking. Do this in small batches. Take the meat out and reserve on plate.

STEP 3: Add the liquid to the pot and bring to a boil while scrapping up the brown bits from the bottom of the pot. While it dissolves it will add flavor to the gravy.

STEP 4: Reduce the heat to low and return the meat and the aromatics to the liquid. It’s very important that the stew must simmer and not boil. Slowly cook the stew over low heat so the liquid barely simmers.

Cover and cook for 2 hours.

STEP 5: After the meat has had a chance to cook for a while, add the 1-inch pieces of carrot and the potatoes. Cook until the meat is fork tender, about an hour. Adjust the salt and pepper and serve.

QUICK CHICKEN TIKKA MASALA

Ingredients

4 teaspoons garam masala*

1/2 teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground turmeric

½ cup unbleached all-purpose fl our

1 pound chicken tenders

4 teaspoons canola oil, divided

6 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

1 large sweet onion, peeled and diced

4 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger,

or 1 tablespoon ground ginger

1 can (28 ounces) plum tomatoes with their juices

1/3 cup heavy (whipping) cream

½ cup chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish

* Garam masala is a blend of spices used in Indian cooking. Usually includes cardamom, black pepper, nutmeg, fennel, cumin, and coriander.

STEP 1: Stir together the garam masala, salt, and turmeric in a small dish. Place the flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle the chicken with ½ teaspoon of the spice mixture and dredge in the flour. Reserve the remaining spice mix and 1 tablespoon of the remaining flour.

STEP 2: Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the chicken until browned, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate.

STEP 3: Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in the pan over medium low heat. Add the garlic, onion, and ginger and cook, stirring often until starting to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the reserved spice mix and cook, stirring until fragrant, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Sprinkle the reserved 1 tablespoon flour and stir until coated.

STEP 4: Add the tomatoes and their juices. Bring to a simmer, stirring and breaking up the tomatoes with a wooden spoon. Cook, stirring often, until thickened and the onion is tender, 3 to 5 minutes.

STEP 5: Stir in the cream. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices to the pan. Bring to a simmer and cook over medium-low heat until the chicken is cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Garnish with the cilantro.

—Caitlin O’Shaughnessy, Viking Adult


The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

One of my New Year’s resolutions for 2014 is to cook more and another is to eat healthier, so the timing of Robert Lustig’s “Fat Chance Cookbook” was perfect.

I am by no means a cook; and I actually sort of hate cooking. Things always seem to go horribly wrong when I do try to cook, and I have absolutely no patience (or timing). As a result, my culinary skills involve heavy microwave use and a lot of takeout. So for the first recipe of the New Year, I decided to go with something easy. I chose “Green Pasta” (p. 226-227) of The Fat Chance Cookbook.

 

 

Recipe:

Makes: 4 cups

Serving size: 1 cup

Active time: 20 minutes

Total time: 40 minutes

Ingredients:

½ pound whole-grain angel hair pasta or spaghetti

1 cup packed fresh spinach, chopped

1 cup basil leaves, packed

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ cup low-fat milk

Salt and pepper, to taste

½ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

Step 1: Cook the pasta according to package directions. In a blender, or food processor if you have one, blend the spinach and basil until mixed.

Step 2: In a large saucepan, sauté the garlic in olive oil. Add the milk and spinach mixture to the saucepan. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to simmer. Stir occasionally until the sauce thickens slightly. Remove from heat. Add the pasta; season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the cheese. Serve immediately.

Sounds easy enough, right? 8 ingredients and 2 steps. I think even I can handle this one.                  The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. LustigI already had all the ingredients except the spinach and basil, so I headed to the store to pick them up. Problem number one: the grocery store didn’t carry fresh spinach, so I had to buy frozen. Make that three steps! Frustratingly, I had to cook and drain the spinach, and it was soggy and warm. I figured it wouldn’t hurt the taste of the pasta, but I’d highly recommend driving around and finding fresh spinach to cut out this step.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig drain

I then moved on to cooking the pasta. I prefer angel hair because I like my pasta soft and it cooks pretty quickly. I dumped a whole box of angel hair into a large pot and let it boil. Step 1 down! On to the next one.

“In a blender…” And here we encounter problem number 2.  (See? Bad luck). At the time of this cooking adventure I was staying at a friend’s house—a lovely friend, but a friend without a blender. After digging through her cupboards, I found a food processor. Or really, parts of a food processor. After trying for about ten minutes to put the thing together I gave up. Plan B? I threw the soggy spinach and basil leaves on the cutting board, grabbed a huge knife, and just went at it.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. LustigI then sautéed the garlic (smelling good!) and added the milk and spinach mixture. While that was cooking, I drained the pasta. I let the sauce cook for about 5-7 minutes and then added it to the pasta.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

Mistake #3 (you knew it was coming) I cooked double the amount of pasta the recipe called for, so the sauce didn’t go very far! However, I tasted the spinach/basil mix on its own and it was fantastic.

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

Voila!

Despite my inevitable mishaps, the pasta turned out great. Even the most inexperienced cooks can pull this one off. And I didn’t feel guilty for eating it! I also had some as leftovers the next day (this time I cooked an egg over-easy in a pan and then tossed the leftover pasta in) and they were DELICIOUS. This dish would also go well with chicken. It’s a fast, easy recipe that tastes great!

The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. Lustig

Now that I have a blender and fresh spinach I may just try again!

—Amanda Oberg, Publicity Assistant, Plume and Hudson Street Press


The Fat Chance Cookbook, Robert H. LustigIt was like, fifteen degrees outside all this weekend in New York.  I just want you to appreciate that.  Fifteen degrees is cold.  Very cold.  When I remembered that I was supposed to make this recipe and blog about it, I was a little disappointed to see that all I had in my fridge was a tub of possibly questionable creme fraiche and a bag of carrots.  So I had to go outside in the ridiculously bitter cold to buy potatoes, cheese, and broccoli.  I lost a toe to frostbite all in order to bring this recipe to you, Penguin blog readers!  Well, ok, that’s not really true, but I could have.

However, if your fridge is reasonably well-stocked (by “well-stocked,” I basically mean that you have other groceries beside hoity-toity expired dairy and rabbit food), then this is a great recipe for you because it’s easy, healthy, and very tasty.  It really doesn’t even feel like health food, which is why when we were divvying up recipes for these blog posts, I jumped on it.

Potatoes? Delicious. Cheddar cheese? Delicious. Broccoli covered in cheesy potatoes? Delicious. Cheesy broccoli potatoes topped with a dollop of creme fraiche that is a little bit….off?  Still delicious.

Recipe from Fat Chance Cookbook:

Broccoli-Cheddar Cheese Potatoes

3 baked russet potatoes

2 bunches of broccoli, steamed until just tender

½ c. milk

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. ground pepper

12 ounces cheddar cheese, grated

Toss broccoli, milk, salt, pepper and 10 ounces cheese with scooped out baked potato flesh. Stuff skins and sprinkle remaining cheese over all. Roast in the oven at 400 degrees for 25 minutes.

Posted by:  Ashley Pattison McClay, Associate Director of Marketing, Plume and Hudson Street Press