Any Other Name, by Craig JohnsonA Serpent's Tooth, by Craig Johnson Spirit of Steamboat, by Craig Johnson

Being in the business I’m in, I sometimes get some strange requests, and I figured I’d share one with you. The other day I got a memo from Orion Entertainment announcing the casting of a new docu-reality television series…

The memo says they’re looking for “authentic and colorful cowboys and their families that live the throwback cowboy lifestyle. They should spend more time on their horse than in their truck!
My first response was who in the heck are these village morons, but like a Ron Popiel commercial—wait, there’s more!
The memo goes on to point out the exact lifestyle elements they should embody. All members of the family need to live a classic cowboy lifestyle and have rugged good looks. Family should have outgoing parents with at least 3 kids, ages ranging from 17 – 35, that are all great looking cowboys and cowgirls. Active grandparents are a plus.
All right, this is almost so funny I’m not sure where to start, but evidently the most important thing in reality TV is rugged good looks or being a fantastic looking cowboy or cowgirl. Now I’ve got to tell you that in all the ranches I ever worked at, the first thing I did was hand over an 8X10 just to make sure I suited the aesthetic of the outfit. I’ve been around some pretty capable hands and they do have a point here, some of the most capable and talented individuals I’ve ever met were certainly not the best looking… It’s kind of hard to look ruggedly handsome while pulling dogies out of the mud. The last point is a real hoot, in that I agree that active grandparents are a plus.
Family needs to be working stunning ranches with diverse terrain and challenges – chasing grizzlies and wolves away from cattle, the struggles of raising crops and making a profit, battling weather elements to keep livestock safe and alive.
It’s gotten so that I have a hard time fighting off the wolves and grizzlies whenever I take the dogs out anymore.
Family and staff of the ranch must be involved in the country lifestyle: hunting, fishing, trapping, building cabins and structures, herding cattle, sheering sheep, farming, etc.
Of course, while doing these things you’ll be fighting off the wolves and grizzlies…
Members of the family and staff should have fun hobbies and skills like singing, play the guitar or harmonica, write and recite poetry, cook the best BBQ in the county, make their own clothes, raise bees or have wild animals as pets, raise bulls, or be an aspiring bull rider or rodeo participant.
You know, in all that free time you have while ranching.
All members of the family need to have big, strong personalities with great and unique looks.
I’m always wondering what Hollywood’s ideas are of “great and unique looks”. Judy says my dilapidated Carhartt jacket, Stormy Kromer hat, and Shipton’s Big-R jeans probably aren’t going to fit the bill.
See you on the trail,
Craig
PS: The tour for Any Other Name is just about finalized and will be attached to the next Post-it. In the meantime, it is available for pre-order SIGNED at Barnes and Noble and a few of your favorite independents. Here are the links:

The Book Rack

Mystery Mikes

Prairie Pages Bookseller

Leather Stalking Books

Old Firehouse Books

Sheridan Stationery Co

PPS: Don’t forget to shop the store (Steamboat Totems are in stock as are hats and shirts and mugs, oh my) and keep an eye out for a new item coming in time for the DVD release of LONGMIRE Season 2 and Mother’s Day.

StoreStore

TOUR OF DUTY

Catch Craig Johnson on his book tour.


any other nameA Serpent's Tooth, by Craig Johnson Spirit of Steamboat, by Craig Johnson

The other day there was an article I saw that had listed the quintessential literary work for each of the states, some of them I’d heard of and some of them I hadn’t, some of them I agreed with and some of them I didn’t. It did, though, get me to thinking about all the Wyoming books I considered to be emblematic of my state, books like The Virginian: A Horseman of the Plains, My Friend Flicka, Shane, The Solace of Open Spaces, Where Rivers Change Direction, Rising From the Plains, The Meadow and many more too numerous to mention. It’s impossible to sum up a place like Wyoming with one book–the place is too big, too broad, and too deep.

One thing I know for sure is that it wouldn’t have been one of mine.
I’ve had an awful lot of wonderful things happen to me in my relatively short writing career, but nothing compares to having Spirit of Steamboat selected as the inaugural One-Book-Wyoming read. I’m going to be traveling all over the state, canvassing the libraries and setting up shop with all the people I know and treasure, the readers and librarians of the Cowboy State. With twenty some events already scheduled and a lot more to get on the calendar, the fine folks down at the Wyoming State Library have us starting off this program with a reception for the State Legislature and then a public signing at the state library in Cheyenne the next day from 10:30 to 1:30. The following week we’ll be in Washington D.C. for another kick-off reception with Wyoming Senator Mike Enzi and his lovely wife Diana.
I would never refer to Spirit of Steamboat as encapsulating the state because I don’t think such a thing can be done, but I think it does represent some of the qualities of Wyoming we all hold dear—drive, determination, ingenuity and a heart as big as the high plains. I hope you’ll join me these coming weeks and in the next year as we celebrate reading with a little book that I hope will do Wyoming proud.

See you on the trail,
-Craig

Tour of Duty

Catch Craig Johnson on his book tour.

Don’t forget to get the hot items below in our store!Any Other Name, by Craig Johnson Any Other Name, by Craig Johnson Any Other Name, Craig Johnson

Remember: New book, Any Other Name, will be out on May 13 and is available for pre-order from all the usual suspects. Working on the tour right now, so keep a watch.

Any Other Name, by Craig Johnson


cold_dishWalt Longmire’s New Year’s Resolutions

1)      Read more.

2)      Lose some weight.

3)      Adopt a more professional relationship with staff.

4)      Give Dog a name.

5)      Finish cabin.

6)      Drink less beer (see #2).

7)      Run with Henry more (see #2).

8)      Call Cady less, so as to not annoy her.

9)      Fix doorknob on office door.

10)  As Vic says, no more crazy shit (see #3).

2011 was a heck of a year, with making the New York Times Bestseller List and the announcement that A&E was green lighting LONGMIRE for a ten-episode, debut season in the summer of 2012. All these things are truly wonderful, but would you like to know the thing that really keeps me in the game, why it is its so easy to write a novel a year?

Walt.

The Longmire novels are written in first-person, which means that the sheriff is never very far from my thoughts or narrative. I tend to refer to Walt as a detective for the disenfranchised, a man whose secret weapon is his compassion for the less fortunate or forgotten members of society. I think he has an empathy for the outsiders because, in a sense, he’s one himself; a rogue male somewhat driven off from the herd, even if it is a self-imposed exile.

longmire_mugAnother thing I like about him is his ability to surprise me. I was talking to Greer Shephard, the producer of the A&E series based on the books, and she asked me if I thought of Walt as being a verbose person and I said yes. She told me to go through one of my books and highlight his dialogue, what he actually says… She was right; he thinks a great deal but doesn’t say much—it was a genuine revelation.

The eighth book, As the Crow Flies, takes place almost exclusively on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, and is, as you’ve grown to expect, a departure. There is the regular ebb and flow of characters but there’s always one stalwart, a guy I can depend on to tell the story with me, a guy whose company I still enjoy even after eight books.

I’ve really come to appreciate the guy, and I’m sure glad you do, too.

See you on the trail,

Craig